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Shahrazad in Cronulla: David Foster's Retelling of One Thousand and One Nights in Sons of the Rumour

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • This reading of David Foster’s Sons of the Rumour focuses on its

    frame story, a reworking of the frame story of One Thousand and

    One Nights. It provides an overview of the impact of One

    Thousand and One Nights on world literature and goes on to

    analyse how Foster reimagines One Thousand and One Nights in

    order to illustrate humanity’s struggle between the spiritual and

    the material world. Foster constructs a parallel dilemma for Al

    Morrisey, a secular Australian Jew, and the Shah, a Persian Muslim.

    Differences between them favours Al’s secularism over the Shah’s

    Islamic faith, and tends to harden and exaggerate stereotypes,

    following a typical Orientalist pattern by recreating the structure

    of One Thousand and One Nights for a Western understanding of

    and taste for Orientalist material.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Mayabadi, F. & Ommundsen, W. "Shahrazad in Cronulla: David Foster's Retelling of One Thousand and One Nights in Sons of the Rumour." Journal of Intercultural Studies 39 .5 (2018): 570-580.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85053012425

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/context/lhapapers/article/4698/type/native/viewcontent

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/3671

Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 570

End Page


  • 580

Volume


  • 39

Issue


  • 5

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • This reading of David Foster’s Sons of the Rumour focuses on its

    frame story, a reworking of the frame story of One Thousand and

    One Nights. It provides an overview of the impact of One

    Thousand and One Nights on world literature and goes on to

    analyse how Foster reimagines One Thousand and One Nights in

    order to illustrate humanity’s struggle between the spiritual and

    the material world. Foster constructs a parallel dilemma for Al

    Morrisey, a secular Australian Jew, and the Shah, a Persian Muslim.

    Differences between them favours Al’s secularism over the Shah’s

    Islamic faith, and tends to harden and exaggerate stereotypes,

    following a typical Orientalist pattern by recreating the structure

    of One Thousand and One Nights for a Western understanding of

    and taste for Orientalist material.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Mayabadi, F. & Ommundsen, W. "Shahrazad in Cronulla: David Foster's Retelling of One Thousand and One Nights in Sons of the Rumour." Journal of Intercultural Studies 39 .5 (2018): 570-580.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85053012425

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/context/lhapapers/article/4698/type/native/viewcontent

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/3671

Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 570

End Page


  • 580

Volume


  • 39

Issue


  • 5

Place Of Publication


  • Australia