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Evaluating an innovative delirium care clinical simulation education intervention: “The scenarios allow nurses to practice what they need to do"

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Evaluating an innovative delirium care clinical simulation education intervention: “The scenarios allow nurses

    to practice what they need to do”

    AIM

    Evaluate the implementation of innovative delirium care clinical simulation education, specifically perceptions

    of confidence and competence about delirium care and experiences of using scenarios.

    METHODS

    The intervention was a multi-modal delirium education programme using face-to-face and online sessions

    and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). A pre-post quasi-experimental design was

    adopted: surveys at baseline, immediately post and six-weeks post and reflections. Settings were public

    (regional and urban) and private (urban) aged care units in NSW. The intervention was delivered by senior

    clinicians and the OSCE scenarios were role played by assistants in nursing.

    RESULTS

    A total of 118 clinicians (enrolled nurses, medical officers, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and

    registered nurses) participated. We will present survey results. After six weeks, the regional public hospital

    had significant improvements in perceived competence (p≤ 0.000) in delirium care and at the urban public

    hospital high results were maintained in perceived confidence (p=.262) and competence (p=.206). Most

    participants rated their satisfaction with the intervention as high (mean 82%). Results from the urban private

    hospital will be available in September.

    CONCLUSION

    It was possible to incorporate the OSCEs into the usual education programme at each site which ensures

    the long-term feasibility of the intervention in clinical settings. In 2018, the study was extended in NSW to UG medical students and in Taipei, Taiwan, with a comparison of non-OSCE education as part of an RCT in intensive care units.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Montgomery, A., Traynor, V. & Chang, H. (2018). Evaluating an innovative delirium care clinical simulation education intervention: “The scenarios allow nurses to practice what they need to do". Australasian Delirium Association 4th Biennial Conference 2018 (pp. 1-2). Melbourne:

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne

Abstract


  • Evaluating an innovative delirium care clinical simulation education intervention: “The scenarios allow nurses

    to practice what they need to do”

    AIM

    Evaluate the implementation of innovative delirium care clinical simulation education, specifically perceptions

    of confidence and competence about delirium care and experiences of using scenarios.

    METHODS

    The intervention was a multi-modal delirium education programme using face-to-face and online sessions

    and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). A pre-post quasi-experimental design was

    adopted: surveys at baseline, immediately post and six-weeks post and reflections. Settings were public

    (regional and urban) and private (urban) aged care units in NSW. The intervention was delivered by senior

    clinicians and the OSCE scenarios were role played by assistants in nursing.

    RESULTS

    A total of 118 clinicians (enrolled nurses, medical officers, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and

    registered nurses) participated. We will present survey results. After six weeks, the regional public hospital

    had significant improvements in perceived competence (p≤ 0.000) in delirium care and at the urban public

    hospital high results were maintained in perceived confidence (p=.262) and competence (p=.206). Most

    participants rated their satisfaction with the intervention as high (mean 82%). Results from the urban private

    hospital will be available in September.

    CONCLUSION

    It was possible to incorporate the OSCEs into the usual education programme at each site which ensures

    the long-term feasibility of the intervention in clinical settings. In 2018, the study was extended in NSW to UG medical students and in Taipei, Taiwan, with a comparison of non-OSCE education as part of an RCT in intensive care units.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Montgomery, A., Traynor, V. & Chang, H. (2018). Evaluating an innovative delirium care clinical simulation education intervention: “The scenarios allow nurses to practice what they need to do". Australasian Delirium Association 4th Biennial Conference 2018 (pp. 1-2). Melbourne:

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne