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Soccer injury movement screen (SIMS) composite score is not associated with injury among semiprofessional soccer players

Journal Article


Abstract


  • BACKGROUND: The association between movement quality and injury is equivocal. No soccer-specific movement assessment has been prospectively investigated in relation to injury risk. U OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between a soccer-specific movement-quality assessment and injury risk among semiprofessional soccer players. U METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, semiprofessional soccer players (n = 306) from 12 clubs completed the Soccer Injury Movement Screen (SIMS) during the preseason period. Individual training/match exposure and noncontac time-loss injuries were recorded prospectively for the entirety of the 2016 season. Relative risks were calculated, and presented with 90% confidence intervals, for the SIMS composite and individual subtest scores from generalized linear models with Poisson distribution offset for exposure. U RESULTS: When considering noncontact time-loss lower extremity injuries (primary level of analysis), there was a most likely trivial association with the SIMS composite score. Similarly, the SIMS composite score demonstrated most likely to likely trivial associations with all injury categories included in the secondary level of analysis (noncontact time-loss hip/groin, thigh, knee, and ankle injuries). When considering hamstring strains and ankle sprains specifically (tertiary level of analysis), the SIMS composite score demonstrated very likely trivial associations. A total of 262 noncontact time-loss injuries were recorded. The overall (training and match exposure combined) incidence of noncontact time-loss injury was 12/1000 hours. U CONCLUSION: The SIMS composite score demonstrated no association with any of the investigated categories of soccer-related injury. The SIMS composite score should not be used to group players into high- or low-risk groups.

UOW Authors


  •   Mccunn, Robert (external author)
  •   aus der Funten, Karen (external author)
  •   Whalan, Matt (external author)
  •   Sampson, John
  •   Meyer, Tim (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • McCunn, R., Aus Der Funten, K., Whalan, M., Sampson, J. A. & Meyer, T. (2018). Soccer injury movement screen (SIMS) composite score is not associated with injury among semiprofessional soccer players. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 48 (8), 630-636.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85050908363

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/121

Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 630

End Page


  • 636

Volume


  • 48

Issue


  • 8

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • BACKGROUND: The association between movement quality and injury is equivocal. No soccer-specific movement assessment has been prospectively investigated in relation to injury risk. U OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between a soccer-specific movement-quality assessment and injury risk among semiprofessional soccer players. U METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, semiprofessional soccer players (n = 306) from 12 clubs completed the Soccer Injury Movement Screen (SIMS) during the preseason period. Individual training/match exposure and noncontac time-loss injuries were recorded prospectively for the entirety of the 2016 season. Relative risks were calculated, and presented with 90% confidence intervals, for the SIMS composite and individual subtest scores from generalized linear models with Poisson distribution offset for exposure. U RESULTS: When considering noncontact time-loss lower extremity injuries (primary level of analysis), there was a most likely trivial association with the SIMS composite score. Similarly, the SIMS composite score demonstrated most likely to likely trivial associations with all injury categories included in the secondary level of analysis (noncontact time-loss hip/groin, thigh, knee, and ankle injuries). When considering hamstring strains and ankle sprains specifically (tertiary level of analysis), the SIMS composite score demonstrated very likely trivial associations. A total of 262 noncontact time-loss injuries were recorded. The overall (training and match exposure combined) incidence of noncontact time-loss injury was 12/1000 hours. U CONCLUSION: The SIMS composite score demonstrated no association with any of the investigated categories of soccer-related injury. The SIMS composite score should not be used to group players into high- or low-risk groups.

UOW Authors


  •   Mccunn, Robert (external author)
  •   aus der Funten, Karen (external author)
  •   Whalan, Matt (external author)
  •   Sampson, John
  •   Meyer, Tim (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • McCunn, R., Aus Der Funten, K., Whalan, M., Sampson, J. A. & Meyer, T. (2018). Soccer injury movement screen (SIMS) composite score is not associated with injury among semiprofessional soccer players. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 48 (8), 630-636.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85050908363

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/121

Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 630

End Page


  • 636

Volume


  • 48

Issue


  • 8

Place Of Publication


  • United States