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Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 as a Point of Convergence for Models of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety-related

    condition that emerges either in prepuberty, which is more

    common in males, or in late adolescence, which is more

    common in females, and is distinguished by time-consuming

    and distressing patterns of repeated persistent thoughts,

    ideas, impulses, images, and behaviors. The prevalence of

    OCD in the United States is 2.3% and is slightly lower in

    pediatric populations (

    1).

    It has been estimated that up to 84%

    of youth diagnosed with OCD have comorbid disorders, such

    as major depressive disorder, alcohol dependence, and social

    phobia. Untreated OCD can lead to signi

    fi

    cant academic,

    social, and family dysfunction. The current pharmacological

    treatments for OCD include serotonin reuptake inhibitors and

    selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. These drugs can cause

    unfavorable side effects, including gastrointestinal upset,

    insomnia, and headaches (

    2). In addition, these agents can

    require months to achieve their therapeutic effects, both

    delaying relief and reducing compliance.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Matosin, N. & Siegel, S. J. (2016). Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 as a Point of Convergence for Models of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Biological Psychiatry, 80 (7), 504-506.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84994817696

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/172

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 504

End Page


  • 506

Volume


  • 80

Issue


  • 7

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety-related

    condition that emerges either in prepuberty, which is more

    common in males, or in late adolescence, which is more

    common in females, and is distinguished by time-consuming

    and distressing patterns of repeated persistent thoughts,

    ideas, impulses, images, and behaviors. The prevalence of

    OCD in the United States is 2.3% and is slightly lower in

    pediatric populations (

    1).

    It has been estimated that up to 84%

    of youth diagnosed with OCD have comorbid disorders, such

    as major depressive disorder, alcohol dependence, and social

    phobia. Untreated OCD can lead to signi

    fi

    cant academic,

    social, and family dysfunction. The current pharmacological

    treatments for OCD include serotonin reuptake inhibitors and

    selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. These drugs can cause

    unfavorable side effects, including gastrointestinal upset,

    insomnia, and headaches (

    2). In addition, these agents can

    require months to achieve their therapeutic effects, both

    delaying relief and reducing compliance.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Matosin, N. & Siegel, S. J. (2016). Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 as a Point of Convergence for Models of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Biological Psychiatry, 80 (7), 504-506.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84994817696

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/172

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 504

End Page


  • 506

Volume


  • 80

Issue


  • 7

Place Of Publication


  • United States