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'Exercise snacks' before meals: A novel strategy to improve glycaemic control in individuals with insulin resistance

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Aims/hypothesis: The aim of this study was to investigate whether small doses of intense exercise before each main meal ('exercise snacks') would result in better blood glucose control than a single bout of prolonged, continuous, moderate-intensity exercise in individuals with insulin resistance. Methods: Nine individuals completed three exercise interventions in randomised order. Measures were recorded across 3 days with exercise performed on the middle day, as either: (1) traditional continuous exercise (CONT), comprising 30 min moderate-intensity (60% of maximal heart rate [HRmax]) incline walking before dinner; (2) exercise snacking (ES), consisting of 6×1 min intense (90% HRmax) incline walking intervals 30 min before each meal; or (3) composite exercise snacking (CES), encompassing 6×1 min intervals alternating between walking and resistance-based exercise, 30 min before meals. Meal timing and composition were controlled within participants for exercise interventions. Results: ES attenuated mean 3 h postprandial glucose concentration following breakfast (by 1.4±1.5 mmol/l, p=0.02) but not lunch (0.4±1.0 mmol/l, p=0.22), and was more effective than CONT following dinner (0.7±1.5 mmol/l below CONT; p=0.04). ES also reduced 24 h mean glucose concentration by 0.7±0.6 mmol/l (p=0.01) and this reduction persisted for the subsequent 24 h (lower by 0.6±0.4 mmol/l vs CONT, relative to their baselines; p=0.01). CES was just as effective as ES (p>0.05 for all glycaemic variables) at improving glycaemic control. Conclusions/interpretation: Dosing exercise as brief, intense 'exercise snacks' before main meals is a time-efficient and effective approach to improve glycaemic control in individuals with insulin resistance. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.

Authors


  •   Dr Monique Francois
  •   Baldi, James (external author)
  •   Manning, Patrick (external author)
  •   Lucas, Samuel (external author)
  •   Hawley, John A. (external author)
  •   Williams, Michael (external author)
  •   Cotter, Jim D. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Francois, M. E., Baldi, J. C., Manning, P. J., Lucas, S. J. E., Hawley, J. A., Williams, M. J. A. & Cotter, J. D. (2014). 'Exercise snacks' before meals: A novel strategy to improve glycaemic control in individuals with insulin resistance. Diabetologia, 57 (7), 1437-1445.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84903550422

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/71

Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 1437

End Page


  • 1445

Volume


  • 57

Issue


  • 7

Place Of Publication


  • Germany

Abstract


  • Aims/hypothesis: The aim of this study was to investigate whether small doses of intense exercise before each main meal ('exercise snacks') would result in better blood glucose control than a single bout of prolonged, continuous, moderate-intensity exercise in individuals with insulin resistance. Methods: Nine individuals completed three exercise interventions in randomised order. Measures were recorded across 3 days with exercise performed on the middle day, as either: (1) traditional continuous exercise (CONT), comprising 30 min moderate-intensity (60% of maximal heart rate [HRmax]) incline walking before dinner; (2) exercise snacking (ES), consisting of 6×1 min intense (90% HRmax) incline walking intervals 30 min before each meal; or (3) composite exercise snacking (CES), encompassing 6×1 min intervals alternating between walking and resistance-based exercise, 30 min before meals. Meal timing and composition were controlled within participants for exercise interventions. Results: ES attenuated mean 3 h postprandial glucose concentration following breakfast (by 1.4±1.5 mmol/l, p=0.02) but not lunch (0.4±1.0 mmol/l, p=0.22), and was more effective than CONT following dinner (0.7±1.5 mmol/l below CONT; p=0.04). ES also reduced 24 h mean glucose concentration by 0.7±0.6 mmol/l (p=0.01) and this reduction persisted for the subsequent 24 h (lower by 0.6±0.4 mmol/l vs CONT, relative to their baselines; p=0.01). CES was just as effective as ES (p>0.05 for all glycaemic variables) at improving glycaemic control. Conclusions/interpretation: Dosing exercise as brief, intense 'exercise snacks' before main meals is a time-efficient and effective approach to improve glycaemic control in individuals with insulin resistance. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.

Authors


  •   Dr Monique Francois
  •   Baldi, James (external author)
  •   Manning, Patrick (external author)
  •   Lucas, Samuel (external author)
  •   Hawley, John A. (external author)
  •   Williams, Michael (external author)
  •   Cotter, Jim D. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Francois, M. E., Baldi, J. C., Manning, P. J., Lucas, S. J. E., Hawley, J. A., Williams, M. J. A. & Cotter, J. D. (2014). 'Exercise snacks' before meals: A novel strategy to improve glycaemic control in individuals with insulin resistance. Diabetologia, 57 (7), 1437-1445.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84903550422

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/71

Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 1437

End Page


  • 1445

Volume


  • 57

Issue


  • 7

Place Of Publication


  • Germany