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Telephone-delivered psychosocial interventions targeting key health priorities in adults with a psychotic disorder: systematic review

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background: The mental and physical health of individuals with a psychotic illness are typically poor. Access to psychosocial interventions is important but currently limited. Telephone-delivered interventions may assist. In the current systematic review, we aim to summarise and critically analyse evidence for telephone-delivered psychosocial interventions targeting key health priorities in adults with a psychotic disorder, including (i) relapse, (ii) adherence to psychiatric medication and/or (iii) modifiable cardiovascular disease risk behaviours. Methods: Ten peer-reviewed and four grey literature databases were searched for English-language studies examining psychosocial telephone-delivered interventions targeting relapse, medication adherence and/or health behaviours in adults with a psychotic disorder. Study heterogeneity precluded meta-analyses. Results: Twenty trials [13 randomised controlled trials (RCTs)] were included, involving 2473 participants (relapse prevention = 867; medication adherence = 1273; and health behaviour = 333). Five of eight RCTs targeting relapse prevention and one of three targeting medication adherence reported at least 50% of outcomes in favour of the telephone-delivered intervention. The two health-behaviour RCTs found comparable levels of improvement across treatment conditions. Conclusions: Although most interventions combined telephone and face-to-face delivery, there was evidence to support the benefit of entirely telephone-delivered interventions. Telephone interventions represent a potentially feasible and effective option for improving key health priorities among people with psychotic disorders. Further methodologically rigorous evaluations are warranted.

Authors


  •   Baker, Amanda (external author)
  •   Turner, Alyna (external author)
  •   Beck, Alison
  •   Berry, Katherine (external author)
  •   Haddock, Gillian (external author)
  •   Kelly, Peter James.
  •   Bucci, Sandra (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Baker, A., Turner, A., Beck, A., Berry, K., Haddock, G., Kelly, P. & Bucci, S. (2018). Telephone-delivered psychosocial interventions targeting key health priorities in adults with a psychotic disorder: systematic review. Psychological Medicine, 48 (16), 2637-2657.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85047410559

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/3652

Number Of Pages


  • 20

Start Page


  • 2637

End Page


  • 2657

Volume


  • 48

Issue


  • 16

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background: The mental and physical health of individuals with a psychotic illness are typically poor. Access to psychosocial interventions is important but currently limited. Telephone-delivered interventions may assist. In the current systematic review, we aim to summarise and critically analyse evidence for telephone-delivered psychosocial interventions targeting key health priorities in adults with a psychotic disorder, including (i) relapse, (ii) adherence to psychiatric medication and/or (iii) modifiable cardiovascular disease risk behaviours. Methods: Ten peer-reviewed and four grey literature databases were searched for English-language studies examining psychosocial telephone-delivered interventions targeting relapse, medication adherence and/or health behaviours in adults with a psychotic disorder. Study heterogeneity precluded meta-analyses. Results: Twenty trials [13 randomised controlled trials (RCTs)] were included, involving 2473 participants (relapse prevention = 867; medication adherence = 1273; and health behaviour = 333). Five of eight RCTs targeting relapse prevention and one of three targeting medication adherence reported at least 50% of outcomes in favour of the telephone-delivered intervention. The two health-behaviour RCTs found comparable levels of improvement across treatment conditions. Conclusions: Although most interventions combined telephone and face-to-face delivery, there was evidence to support the benefit of entirely telephone-delivered interventions. Telephone interventions represent a potentially feasible and effective option for improving key health priorities among people with psychotic disorders. Further methodologically rigorous evaluations are warranted.

Authors


  •   Baker, Amanda (external author)
  •   Turner, Alyna (external author)
  •   Beck, Alison
  •   Berry, Katherine (external author)
  •   Haddock, Gillian (external author)
  •   Kelly, Peter James.
  •   Bucci, Sandra (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Baker, A., Turner, A., Beck, A., Berry, K., Haddock, G., Kelly, P. & Bucci, S. (2018). Telephone-delivered psychosocial interventions targeting key health priorities in adults with a psychotic disorder: systematic review. Psychological Medicine, 48 (16), 2637-2657.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85047410559

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/3652

Number Of Pages


  • 20

Start Page


  • 2637

End Page


  • 2657

Volume


  • 48

Issue


  • 16

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom