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Dying a Natural Death: Ethics and Political Activism for Endemic Infectious Disease

Chapter


Abstract


  • In late 2014, the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa

    was at its peak. Th ose infected numbered in the tens of thousands.

    “Hotspots” with multiple cases appeared across four nations, both in

    overcrowded major cities and in isolated rural villages. Hospitals were

    overfl owing. Th ere were insuffi cient laboratory facilities and trained

    health care workers to diagnose cases swiftly; and disintegrated or absent

    public infrastructure in all domains, from roads and sewers to epidemiologists

    and health promoters, hampered international responders. Nurses

    and doctors—already far overstretched, and servicing absurd populations

    at a ratio of 1:1000 even before the outbreak—were often among the fi rst

    infected and dead.

Authors


  •   Hooker, Claire (external author)
  •   Degeling, Chris
  •   Mason, Paul (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Hooker, C., Degeling, C. & Mason, P. (2016). Dying a Natural Death: Ethics and Political Activism for Endemic Infectious Disease. In K. Nixon & L. Servitje (Eds.), Endemic Essays in Contagion Theory (pp. 265-290). United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781137521408

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84995919431

Book Title


  • Endemic Essays in Contagion Theory

Start Page


  • 265

End Page


  • 290

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • In late 2014, the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa

    was at its peak. Th ose infected numbered in the tens of thousands.

    “Hotspots” with multiple cases appeared across four nations, both in

    overcrowded major cities and in isolated rural villages. Hospitals were

    overfl owing. Th ere were insuffi cient laboratory facilities and trained

    health care workers to diagnose cases swiftly; and disintegrated or absent

    public infrastructure in all domains, from roads and sewers to epidemiologists

    and health promoters, hampered international responders. Nurses

    and doctors—already far overstretched, and servicing absurd populations

    at a ratio of 1:1000 even before the outbreak—were often among the fi rst

    infected and dead.

Authors


  •   Hooker, Claire (external author)
  •   Degeling, Chris
  •   Mason, Paul (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Hooker, C., Degeling, C. & Mason, P. (2016). Dying a Natural Death: Ethics and Political Activism for Endemic Infectious Disease. In K. Nixon & L. Servitje (Eds.), Endemic Essays in Contagion Theory (pp. 265-290). United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781137521408

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84995919431

Book Title


  • Endemic Essays in Contagion Theory

Start Page


  • 265

End Page


  • 290

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom