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It’s a dog’s life when man’s best friend becomes his fattest

Journal Article


Abstract


  • A study published this morning in Nature offers further insight into how dogs became domesticated. The comparative analysis of human, canine and wolf genomes suggests that humans and dogs have evolved in parallel as a response to the increasingly starchy diets on offer after the agricultural revolution. Such a wholesale change in diet has not necessarily been benign for either species.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Degeling, C. (2013). It’s a dog’s life when man’s best friend becomes his fattest. The Conversation, 24 January 1-3.

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 3

Volume


  • 24 January

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • A study published this morning in Nature offers further insight into how dogs became domesticated. The comparative analysis of human, canine and wolf genomes suggests that humans and dogs have evolved in parallel as a response to the increasingly starchy diets on offer after the agricultural revolution. Such a wholesale change in diet has not necessarily been benign for either species.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Degeling, C. (2013). It’s a dog’s life when man’s best friend becomes his fattest. The Conversation, 24 January 1-3.

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 3

Volume


  • 24 January

Place Of Publication


  • Australia