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Promoting a New Convergence: Developing New Regulatory Paradigms for Marine Areas beyond National Jurisdiction in the Pacific’

Chapter


Abstract


  • The Pacific is the largest ocean basin in the world covering a vast area estimated

    to be around sixty-four million square miles. Studded with small island

    developing states and rimmed with some of the world’s largest economies, it

    is unimaginably diverse, in geographic, economic, social and environmental

    terms. The region is characterised by vast tracts of ocean space dotted with

    land masses which range from sizeable island nations such as Australia and

    New Zealand to tiny dependencies such as the Pitcairn Islands.1 The majority

    of small islands in the South Pacific region have land areas under 700 square

    kilometres

    and are heavily dependent on a healthy marine environment for

    their survival.2 The region has one of the highest quotients of biodiversity

    in the world with a large population of rare and endangered species such as

    dugongs,

    sea turtles and whales.3 This cornucopia of biodiversity is subject to

    multiple stress factors including population growth, natural disasters, unsustainable

    fisheries practices and alien species invasion.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Warner, R. (2018). Promoting a New Convergence: Developing New Regulatory Paradigms for Marine Areas beyond National Jurisdiction in the Pacific’. In H. Scheiber, N. Oral & M. Kwon (Eds.), Ocean law debates The 50-year legacy and emerging issues for the years ahead (pp. 381-400). Boston: Brill Nijhoff.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9789004343139

Book Title


  • Ocean law debates The 50-year legacy and emerging issues for the years ahead

Start Page


  • 381

End Page


  • 400

Place Of Publication


  • Boston

Abstract


  • The Pacific is the largest ocean basin in the world covering a vast area estimated

    to be around sixty-four million square miles. Studded with small island

    developing states and rimmed with some of the world’s largest economies, it

    is unimaginably diverse, in geographic, economic, social and environmental

    terms. The region is characterised by vast tracts of ocean space dotted with

    land masses which range from sizeable island nations such as Australia and

    New Zealand to tiny dependencies such as the Pitcairn Islands.1 The majority

    of small islands in the South Pacific region have land areas under 700 square

    kilometres

    and are heavily dependent on a healthy marine environment for

    their survival.2 The region has one of the highest quotients of biodiversity

    in the world with a large population of rare and endangered species such as

    dugongs,

    sea turtles and whales.3 This cornucopia of biodiversity is subject to

    multiple stress factors including population growth, natural disasters, unsustainable

    fisheries practices and alien species invasion.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Warner, R. (2018). Promoting a New Convergence: Developing New Regulatory Paradigms for Marine Areas beyond National Jurisdiction in the Pacific’. In H. Scheiber, N. Oral & M. Kwon (Eds.), Ocean law debates The 50-year legacy and emerging issues for the years ahead (pp. 381-400). Boston: Brill Nijhoff.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9789004343139

Book Title


  • Ocean law debates The 50-year legacy and emerging issues for the years ahead

Start Page


  • 381

End Page


  • 400

Place Of Publication


  • Boston