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A wearable device for monitoring sweat rates via image analysis

Journal Article


Abstract


  • A feasibility study on a new technique capable of

    monitoring localized sweat rate is explored in this paper.Wearable

    devices commonly used in clinical practice for sweat sampling (i.e.,

    Macroducts) were positioned on the body of an athlete whose sweat

    rate was then monitored during cycling sessions. The position at

    which the sweat fills the Macroduct was indicated by a contrasting

    marker and captured via a series of time-stamped photos or a

    video recording of the device during an exercise period. Given that

    the time of each captured image/frame is known (either through

    time stamp on photos or the constant frame rate of the video

    capture), it was, therefore, possible to estimate the sweat flow rate

    through a simple calibration model. The importance of gathering

    such valuable information is described, together with the results

    from a number of exercise trials to investigate the viability of this

    approach.

UOW Authors


  •   Matzeu, Giusy (external author)
  •   Fay, Cormac
  •   Vaillant, Alix (external author)
  •   Coyle, Shirley (external author)
  •   Diamond, Dermot (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Matzeu, G., Fay, C., Vaillant, A., Coyle, S. & Diamond, D. (2016). A wearable device for monitoring sweat rates via image analysis. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 63 (8), 1672-1680.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84986251711

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 1672

End Page


  • 1680

Volume


  • 63

Issue


  • 8

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • A feasibility study on a new technique capable of

    monitoring localized sweat rate is explored in this paper.Wearable

    devices commonly used in clinical practice for sweat sampling (i.e.,

    Macroducts) were positioned on the body of an athlete whose sweat

    rate was then monitored during cycling sessions. The position at

    which the sweat fills the Macroduct was indicated by a contrasting

    marker and captured via a series of time-stamped photos or a

    video recording of the device during an exercise period. Given that

    the time of each captured image/frame is known (either through

    time stamp on photos or the constant frame rate of the video

    capture), it was, therefore, possible to estimate the sweat flow rate

    through a simple calibration model. The importance of gathering

    such valuable information is described, together with the results

    from a number of exercise trials to investigate the viability of this

    approach.

UOW Authors


  •   Matzeu, Giusy (external author)
  •   Fay, Cormac
  •   Vaillant, Alix (external author)
  •   Coyle, Shirley (external author)
  •   Diamond, Dermot (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Matzeu, G., Fay, C., Vaillant, A., Coyle, S. & Diamond, D. (2016). A wearable device for monitoring sweat rates via image analysis. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 63 (8), 1672-1680.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84986251711

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 1672

End Page


  • 1680

Volume


  • 63

Issue


  • 8

Place Of Publication


  • United States