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Reprint of Modelling wetland surface elevation dynamics and its application to forecasting the effects of sea-level rise on estuarine wetlands

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Empirical data derived from a network of surface elevation tables established on the Hunter River,

    Australia, in 2000 was used to model sediment accretion within estuarine wetlands using factorial analysis of variance. As surface elevation change did not differ significantly from accretion over the 10 year

    study period in the mangrove and saltmarsh (p = 0.4104), the accretion model was regarded as a reliable

    estimate of elevation change. Using the current rate of sea-level rise (3.65 mm y−1), a rate deemed to

    be relatively moderate, a landscape elevation model was developed by applying the accretion model to

    a LiDAR-derived digital elevation model at annual increments to 2050. Based on current rates of sealevel rise and the intertidal elevation that currently supports mangrove and saltmarsh, the landscape

    elevation model projected a 16% increase in the area within the elevation range suitable to support mangrove and saltmarsh. This contrasts ‘bathtub modelling’, which projected a 6% decline in wetland extent.

    Bathtub modelling fails to account for the ability of mangrove and saltmarsh to accommodate sea-level

    rise through processes of accretion, shrink-swell of sediments and the accumulation of organic material.

    Results from the landscape elevation model suggest that planning for sea-level rise should be directed

    towards facilitating wetland adaptation by promoting tidal exchange to mangrove and saltmarsh and

    providing land for wetland migration.

Authors


  •   Rogers, Kerrylee
  •   Saintilan, Neil (external author)
  •   Copeland, Craig (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Rogers, K., Saintilan, N. & Copeland, C. (2013). Reprint of Modelling wetland surface elevation dynamics and its application to forecasting the effects of sea-level rise on estuarine wetlands. Ecological Modelling, 264 27-36.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84880702941

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 9

Start Page


  • 27

End Page


  • 36

Volume


  • 264

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands

Abstract


  • Empirical data derived from a network of surface elevation tables established on the Hunter River,

    Australia, in 2000 was used to model sediment accretion within estuarine wetlands using factorial analysis of variance. As surface elevation change did not differ significantly from accretion over the 10 year

    study period in the mangrove and saltmarsh (p = 0.4104), the accretion model was regarded as a reliable

    estimate of elevation change. Using the current rate of sea-level rise (3.65 mm y−1), a rate deemed to

    be relatively moderate, a landscape elevation model was developed by applying the accretion model to

    a LiDAR-derived digital elevation model at annual increments to 2050. Based on current rates of sealevel rise and the intertidal elevation that currently supports mangrove and saltmarsh, the landscape

    elevation model projected a 16% increase in the area within the elevation range suitable to support mangrove and saltmarsh. This contrasts ‘bathtub modelling’, which projected a 6% decline in wetland extent.

    Bathtub modelling fails to account for the ability of mangrove and saltmarsh to accommodate sea-level

    rise through processes of accretion, shrink-swell of sediments and the accumulation of organic material.

    Results from the landscape elevation model suggest that planning for sea-level rise should be directed

    towards facilitating wetland adaptation by promoting tidal exchange to mangrove and saltmarsh and

    providing land for wetland migration.

Authors


  •   Rogers, Kerrylee
  •   Saintilan, Neil (external author)
  •   Copeland, Craig (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Rogers, K., Saintilan, N. & Copeland, C. (2013). Reprint of Modelling wetland surface elevation dynamics and its application to forecasting the effects of sea-level rise on estuarine wetlands. Ecological Modelling, 264 27-36.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84880702941

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 9

Start Page


  • 27

End Page


  • 36

Volume


  • 264

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands