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Implementing Resistance Training in Secondary Schools: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Purpose: Guidelines recommend that young people engage in muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 dIwkj1

    . The purpose of this

    study was to examine the effect of a school-based intervention focused on resistance training (RT) for adolescents. Methods: The ‘‘Resistance

    Training for Teens’’ intervention was evaluated using a cluster-randomized, controlled trial with 607 adolescents (50.1% girls; 14.1 T 0.5 yr)

    from 16 secondary schools. Teachers were trained to deliver the intervention, which included the following: (i) an interactive student

    seminar; (ii) a structured physical activity program, focused on RT; (iii) lunchtime fitness sessions; and (iv) Web-based smartphone apps.

    The primary outcome was muscular fitness (MF) and secondary outcomes included body mass index, RT skill competency, flexibility, physical

    activity, self-efficacy, and motivation. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months (postprogram; primary end point), and 12 months

    (follow-up). Outcomes were assessed using linear mixed models, with three potential moderators tested using interaction terms (and subgroup

    analyses where appropriate). Results: For the primary outcome (MF), a group–time effect was observed at 6 months for the upper body

    (2.0 repetitions; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8–3.2), but not the lower body (j1.4 cm; 95% CI, j4.7–1.9). At 6 months, there were

    intervention effects for RT skill competency and self-efficacy, but no other secondary outcomes. Effects for upper body MF and RT skill

    competency were sustained at 12 months. Despite overall no effect for body mass index, there was a group–time effect at 12 months among

    students who were overweight/obese at baseline (j0.55 kgImj2

    ; 95% CI, j1.01 to j0.08). Conclusions: The school-based RT intervention

    resulted in immediate and sustained improvements in upper body MF and RT skill competency, demonstrating an effective and scalable

    approach to delivering RT within secondary school

Authors


  •   Kennedy, Sarah G. (external author)
  •   Smith, Jordan J. (external author)
  •   Morgan, Philip J. (external author)
  •   Peralta, Louisa (external author)
  •   Hilland, Toni A. (external author)
  •   Eather, Narelle (external author)
  •   Lonsdale, Chris (external author)
  •   Okely, Anthony D.
  •   Plotnikoff, Ronald (external author)
  •   Salmon, Jo (external author)
  •   Dewar, Deborah (external author)
  •   Estabrooks, Paul (external author)
  •   Pollock, Emma (external author)
  •   Finn, Tara (external author)
  •   Lubans, David R. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Kennedy, S. G., Smith, J. J., Morgan, P. J., Peralta, L. R., Hilland, T. A., Eather, N., Lonsdale, C., Okely, A. D., Plotnikoff, R. C., Salmon, J., Dewar, D. L., Estabrooks, P. A., Pollock, E., Finn, T. L. & Lubans, D. R. (2018). Implementing Resistance Training in Secondary Schools: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 50 (1), 62-72.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85038220149

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/3347

Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 62

End Page


  • 72

Volume


  • 50

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Purpose: Guidelines recommend that young people engage in muscle-strengthening activities on at least 3 dIwkj1

    . The purpose of this

    study was to examine the effect of a school-based intervention focused on resistance training (RT) for adolescents. Methods: The ‘‘Resistance

    Training for Teens’’ intervention was evaluated using a cluster-randomized, controlled trial with 607 adolescents (50.1% girls; 14.1 T 0.5 yr)

    from 16 secondary schools. Teachers were trained to deliver the intervention, which included the following: (i) an interactive student

    seminar; (ii) a structured physical activity program, focused on RT; (iii) lunchtime fitness sessions; and (iv) Web-based smartphone apps.

    The primary outcome was muscular fitness (MF) and secondary outcomes included body mass index, RT skill competency, flexibility, physical

    activity, self-efficacy, and motivation. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months (postprogram; primary end point), and 12 months

    (follow-up). Outcomes were assessed using linear mixed models, with three potential moderators tested using interaction terms (and subgroup

    analyses where appropriate). Results: For the primary outcome (MF), a group–time effect was observed at 6 months for the upper body

    (2.0 repetitions; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.8–3.2), but not the lower body (j1.4 cm; 95% CI, j4.7–1.9). At 6 months, there were

    intervention effects for RT skill competency and self-efficacy, but no other secondary outcomes. Effects for upper body MF and RT skill

    competency were sustained at 12 months. Despite overall no effect for body mass index, there was a group–time effect at 12 months among

    students who were overweight/obese at baseline (j0.55 kgImj2

    ; 95% CI, j1.01 to j0.08). Conclusions: The school-based RT intervention

    resulted in immediate and sustained improvements in upper body MF and RT skill competency, demonstrating an effective and scalable

    approach to delivering RT within secondary school

Authors


  •   Kennedy, Sarah G. (external author)
  •   Smith, Jordan J. (external author)
  •   Morgan, Philip J. (external author)
  •   Peralta, Louisa (external author)
  •   Hilland, Toni A. (external author)
  •   Eather, Narelle (external author)
  •   Lonsdale, Chris (external author)
  •   Okely, Anthony D.
  •   Plotnikoff, Ronald (external author)
  •   Salmon, Jo (external author)
  •   Dewar, Deborah (external author)
  •   Estabrooks, Paul (external author)
  •   Pollock, Emma (external author)
  •   Finn, Tara (external author)
  •   Lubans, David R. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Kennedy, S. G., Smith, J. J., Morgan, P. J., Peralta, L. R., Hilland, T. A., Eather, N., Lonsdale, C., Okely, A. D., Plotnikoff, R. C., Salmon, J., Dewar, D. L., Estabrooks, P. A., Pollock, E., Finn, T. L. & Lubans, D. R. (2018). Implementing Resistance Training in Secondary Schools: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 50 (1), 62-72.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85038220149

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/3347

Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 62

End Page


  • 72

Volume


  • 50

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United States