Skip to main content
placeholder image

Something wonderful in my back yard: the social impetus for group self- building

Chapter


Download full-text (Open Access)

Abstract


  • The housing crisis in the United Kingdom, as Barker (2004) identifies,

    has become shorthand for a chronic lack of suitable and affordable housing

    – in both the home ownership and rental sectors – and the undersupply

    and diminishment of social housing stock (Barker, 2004; Jefferys

    et al., 2014). What has also become clear is that the mainstream housebuilding

    sector – speculative housing development – has not risen to the

    task of ameliorating this crisis. Consequently, there is increasing marginalisation

    within the housing and land economy, with many people

    finding that their housing needs cannot be met by the sector. This chapter

    focuses on the experiences and perceptions of those who have been

    involved in group self- build projects, where households are involved in

    the design and/ or production of homes, either by arranging for their construction

    or building homes themselves within a group of three or more

    households (see also Duncan and Rowe, 1993). Against the background

    of the UK’s housing crisis, this focus is particularly timely, as such group

    self- build projects are widely promoted as offering a route into housing

    that runs counter to these conditions.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Heffernan, E. & de Wilde, P. (2017). Something wonderful in my back yard: the social impetus for group self- building. In M. Benson & I. Hamiduddin (Eds.), Self-Build Homes: Social Discourse, Experiences and Directions (pp. 174-191). London, United Kingdom: UCL Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781911576891

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1896&context=eispapers1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers1/894

Book Title


  • Self-Build Homes: Social Discourse, Experiences and Directions

Start Page


  • 174

End Page


  • 191

Place Of Publication


  • London, United Kingdom

Abstract


  • The housing crisis in the United Kingdom, as Barker (2004) identifies,

    has become shorthand for a chronic lack of suitable and affordable housing

    – in both the home ownership and rental sectors – and the undersupply

    and diminishment of social housing stock (Barker, 2004; Jefferys

    et al., 2014). What has also become clear is that the mainstream housebuilding

    sector – speculative housing development – has not risen to the

    task of ameliorating this crisis. Consequently, there is increasing marginalisation

    within the housing and land economy, with many people

    finding that their housing needs cannot be met by the sector. This chapter

    focuses on the experiences and perceptions of those who have been

    involved in group self- build projects, where households are involved in

    the design and/ or production of homes, either by arranging for their construction

    or building homes themselves within a group of three or more

    households (see also Duncan and Rowe, 1993). Against the background

    of the UK’s housing crisis, this focus is particularly timely, as such group

    self- build projects are widely promoted as offering a route into housing

    that runs counter to these conditions.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Heffernan, E. & de Wilde, P. (2017). Something wonderful in my back yard: the social impetus for group self- building. In M. Benson & I. Hamiduddin (Eds.), Self-Build Homes: Social Discourse, Experiences and Directions (pp. 174-191). London, United Kingdom: UCL Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781911576891

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1896&context=eispapers1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers1/894

Book Title


  • Self-Build Homes: Social Discourse, Experiences and Directions

Start Page


  • 174

End Page


  • 191

Place Of Publication


  • London, United Kingdom