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High rates of hospitalised burn injury in Indigenous children living in remote areas: A population data linkage study

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Burns are a leading cause of child morbidity and mortality in Australia.1,2 Previous studies have shown that Indigenous children and children living in rural and remote areas are disproportionally affected by burn injuries.3,4A much larger proportion of Indigenous (5.1%) compared with non-Indigenous (0.5%) children live in remote areas.5 However, to our knowledge, it has not yet been explored if living in remote areas impacts differently on the risk of burn injury in Indigenous compared with non-Indigenous children. This level of information is important to inform if burn injury prevention measures specifically targeted at Indigenous children in remote areas are needed.

Authors


  •   Ivers, Rebecca Q. (external author)
  •   Clapham, Kathleen F.
  •   Harvey, Lara (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • H. Moller, K. Falster, R. Ivers, K. Clapham, L. Harvey & L. Jorm, "High rates of hospitalised burn injury in Indigenous children living in remote areas: A population data linkage study", Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health Online first (2017) 1-2.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85034759955

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1899&context=ahsri

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ahsri/878

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 2

Volume


  • Online first

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Burns are a leading cause of child morbidity and mortality in Australia.1,2 Previous studies have shown that Indigenous children and children living in rural and remote areas are disproportionally affected by burn injuries.3,4A much larger proportion of Indigenous (5.1%) compared with non-Indigenous (0.5%) children live in remote areas.5 However, to our knowledge, it has not yet been explored if living in remote areas impacts differently on the risk of burn injury in Indigenous compared with non-Indigenous children. This level of information is important to inform if burn injury prevention measures specifically targeted at Indigenous children in remote areas are needed.

Authors


  •   Ivers, Rebecca Q. (external author)
  •   Clapham, Kathleen F.
  •   Harvey, Lara (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • H. Moller, K. Falster, R. Ivers, K. Clapham, L. Harvey & L. Jorm, "High rates of hospitalised burn injury in Indigenous children living in remote areas: A population data linkage study", Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health Online first (2017) 1-2.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85034759955

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1899&context=ahsri

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ahsri/878

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 2

Volume


  • Online first

Place Of Publication


  • Australia