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Queensland Liberals and Nationals have long had an uneasy cohabitation, and now should consider divorce

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • There can be no doubt that in matters political Queensland is different from the rest of Australia.

    It is the only state that has a single house of parliament. It is the only state that has a single council for its capital city. It is the only state in which the Country (and later National) Party has been the dominant force on the non-Labor side of politics and, for a time in the 1980s, held government in its own right.

    The rhythm of Queensland politics has been for one party to hold power for long stretches of time. Labor was in government from 1932 to 1957, losing government that year as the Labor Party split. The Country Party held power, first in coalition with the Liberals and then in its own right, from 1957 to 1989. Subsequently, Labor was in office, except for a short time in 1996, from 1989 to 2012.

    Queensland voters, at least in recent times, also seem to be more volatile in their voting habits, perhaps more resembling Canada than other parts of Australia. In Sydney, for example, there are electorates that are so rusted on to a political party that electing a member from another party is unthinkable.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Melleuish, G. (2017). Queensland Liberals and Nationals have long had an uneasy cohabitation, and now should consider divorce. The Conversation, 30 November 1-3.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4277&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/3262

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 3

Volume


  • 30 November

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • There can be no doubt that in matters political Queensland is different from the rest of Australia.

    It is the only state that has a single house of parliament. It is the only state that has a single council for its capital city. It is the only state in which the Country (and later National) Party has been the dominant force on the non-Labor side of politics and, for a time in the 1980s, held government in its own right.

    The rhythm of Queensland politics has been for one party to hold power for long stretches of time. Labor was in government from 1932 to 1957, losing government that year as the Labor Party split. The Country Party held power, first in coalition with the Liberals and then in its own right, from 1957 to 1989. Subsequently, Labor was in office, except for a short time in 1996, from 1989 to 2012.

    Queensland voters, at least in recent times, also seem to be more volatile in their voting habits, perhaps more resembling Canada than other parts of Australia. In Sydney, for example, there are electorates that are so rusted on to a political party that electing a member from another party is unthinkable.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Melleuish, G. (2017). Queensland Liberals and Nationals have long had an uneasy cohabitation, and now should consider divorce. The Conversation, 30 November 1-3.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4277&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/3262

Number Of Pages


  • 2

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 3

Volume


  • 30 November

Place Of Publication


  • Australia