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Innovations in capture fisheries are an imperative for nutrition security in the developing world

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • This article examines two strands of discourse on wild capture fisheries; one that focuses on resource sustainability and environmental impacts, another related to food and nutrition security and human well-being. Available data and research show that, for countries most dependent on fish to meet the nutritional requirements of their population, wild capture fisheries remain the dominant supplier. Although, contrary to popular narratives, the sustainability of these fisheries is not always and everywhere in crisis, securing their sustainability is essential and requires considerable effort across a broad spectrum of fishery systems. An impediment to achieving this is that the current research and policy discourses on environmental sustainability of fisheries and food security remain only loosely and superficially linked. Overcoming this requires adoption of a broader sustainability science paradigm to help harness synergies and negotiate tradeoffs between food security, resource conservation, and macroeconomic development goals. The way society chooses to govern fisheries is, however, an ethical choice, not just a technical one, and we recommend adding an ethical dimension to sustainability science as applied to fisheries.

UOW Authors


  •   Hall, Stephen J. (external author)
  •   Hilborn, Ray (external author)
  •   Andrew, Neil
  •   Allison, Edward H. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Hall, S. J., Hilborn, R., Andrew, N. L. & Allison, E. H. (2013). Innovations in capture fisheries are an imperative for nutrition security in the developing world. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110 (21), 8393-8398.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84878147358

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4291&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/3276

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 8393

End Page


  • 8398

Volume


  • 110

Issue


  • 21

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • This article examines two strands of discourse on wild capture fisheries; one that focuses on resource sustainability and environmental impacts, another related to food and nutrition security and human well-being. Available data and research show that, for countries most dependent on fish to meet the nutritional requirements of their population, wild capture fisheries remain the dominant supplier. Although, contrary to popular narratives, the sustainability of these fisheries is not always and everywhere in crisis, securing their sustainability is essential and requires considerable effort across a broad spectrum of fishery systems. An impediment to achieving this is that the current research and policy discourses on environmental sustainability of fisheries and food security remain only loosely and superficially linked. Overcoming this requires adoption of a broader sustainability science paradigm to help harness synergies and negotiate tradeoffs between food security, resource conservation, and macroeconomic development goals. The way society chooses to govern fisheries is, however, an ethical choice, not just a technical one, and we recommend adding an ethical dimension to sustainability science as applied to fisheries.

UOW Authors


  •   Hall, Stephen J. (external author)
  •   Hilborn, Ray (external author)
  •   Andrew, Neil
  •   Allison, Edward H. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Hall, S. J., Hilborn, R., Andrew, N. L. & Allison, E. H. (2013). Innovations in capture fisheries are an imperative for nutrition security in the developing world. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110 (21), 8393-8398.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84878147358

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4291&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/3276

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 8393

End Page


  • 8398

Volume


  • 110

Issue


  • 21

Place Of Publication


  • United States