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Crime in the streets

Chapter


Abstract


  • The way people think about crime, and in particular, the things that

    people fear about crime, are powerfully influenced by the imagery and meanings

    associated with crime on the streets. Crime takes place in every conceivable

    location, but it Is street crime that resonates with our concerns about when and

    how we may become victims of crime. Street crime is no more serious than crime

    in other places, but it is commonplace and visible. The common forms of street

    crime -robbery, street violence and theft -have been around ever since there

    were streets. However, their specific characteristics have changed over time, and

    the way the criminal justice system responds to street crime is subject to dramatic

    shifts. Street crime is the public face of crime. It provides a window onto the way

    our society functions, generates images of deviance that help us define ourselves

    and serves as a receptacle for many of our fears about modern life.

    In this chapter, we examine how people feel about street crime and how

    these feelings emerge out of more general concerns about social control, class,

    and racial differences. In this sense, the concept of street crime goes beyond the

    literal description of crime that occurs in public places and becomes a metaphor

    for crime as the consequence of social disorder. We examine the policing of

    public space and consider how changes in the regulation of public space have

    given rise to changes in the patterns of street crime. Data are presented on the

    extent and characteristics of three forms of street crime (robbery, violence, and

    alcohol related crimes), t =he nature of the offenders and victims involved,

    and the way that criminal justice agencies have responded to them. A key point

    is that peoples' perceptions and beIiefs about street crime differ greatIy from

    what is known from police and victim survey data on the characteristics and

    patterns of street crime. We suggest that in order to be effective, street crime

    prevention must address the fact that street crime arises out of the interactions

    of people using public space.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Edition


  • 4

Citation


  • Ross, S. & Hanley, N. (2012). Crime in the streets. In M. Marmo, W. de Lint & D. Palmer (Eds.), Crime and Justice: A Guide to Criminology (pp. 151-170). Pyrmont, Australia: Thomson Reuters.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780455228600

Book Title


  • Crime and Justice: A Guide to Criminology

Start Page


  • 151

End Page


  • 170

Place Of Publication


  • Pyrmont, Australia

Abstract


  • The way people think about crime, and in particular, the things that

    people fear about crime, are powerfully influenced by the imagery and meanings

    associated with crime on the streets. Crime takes place in every conceivable

    location, but it Is street crime that resonates with our concerns about when and

    how we may become victims of crime. Street crime is no more serious than crime

    in other places, but it is commonplace and visible. The common forms of street

    crime -robbery, street violence and theft -have been around ever since there

    were streets. However, their specific characteristics have changed over time, and

    the way the criminal justice system responds to street crime is subject to dramatic

    shifts. Street crime is the public face of crime. It provides a window onto the way

    our society functions, generates images of deviance that help us define ourselves

    and serves as a receptacle for many of our fears about modern life.

    In this chapter, we examine how people feel about street crime and how

    these feelings emerge out of more general concerns about social control, class,

    and racial differences. In this sense, the concept of street crime goes beyond the

    literal description of crime that occurs in public places and becomes a metaphor

    for crime as the consequence of social disorder. We examine the policing of

    public space and consider how changes in the regulation of public space have

    given rise to changes in the patterns of street crime. Data are presented on the

    extent and characteristics of three forms of street crime (robbery, violence, and

    alcohol related crimes), t =he nature of the offenders and victims involved,

    and the way that criminal justice agencies have responded to them. A key point

    is that peoples' perceptions and beIiefs about street crime differ greatIy from

    what is known from police and victim survey data on the characteristics and

    patterns of street crime. We suggest that in order to be effective, street crime

    prevention must address the fact that street crime arises out of the interactions

    of people using public space.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Edition


  • 4

Citation


  • Ross, S. & Hanley, N. (2012). Crime in the streets. In M. Marmo, W. de Lint & D. Palmer (Eds.), Crime and Justice: A Guide to Criminology (pp. 151-170). Pyrmont, Australia: Thomson Reuters.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780455228600

Book Title


  • Crime and Justice: A Guide to Criminology

Start Page


  • 151

End Page


  • 170

Place Of Publication


  • Pyrmont, Australia