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Teaching little Professors: Autism Spectrum on TV and in the Classroom

Chapter


Abstract


  • A rudimentary understanding of some of the atypical behaviors displayed by students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be gleaned from watching popular television representations of individuals commonly believed to be on the autism spectrum. A number of popular culture television programs, such as Bones and The Big Bang Theory (from the United States) and Doc Martin (from the United Kingdom) feature characters who.are often read by audiences as featuring characteristics that are symptomatic of autism. These cultural references provide an opportunity and a language to discuss such characteristics, and to understand how to accommodate them socially and in classrooms. This is a strategy that I have used to initiate conversations about the traits and learning needs of students on the spectrum with both my university colleagues and pre-service teachers at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • McMahon-Coleman, K. (2017). Teaching little Professors: Autism Spectrum on TV and in the Classroom. In E. Janak & L. A. Sourdot (Eds.), Educating through Popular Culture: You're Not Cool Just Because You Teach with Comics (pp. 145-160). United Kingdom: Lexington Books.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781498549172

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/asdpapers/699

Book Title


  • Educating through Popular Culture: You're Not Cool Just Because You Teach with Comics

Start Page


  • 145

End Page


  • 160

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • A rudimentary understanding of some of the atypical behaviors displayed by students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be gleaned from watching popular television representations of individuals commonly believed to be on the autism spectrum. A number of popular culture television programs, such as Bones and The Big Bang Theory (from the United States) and Doc Martin (from the United Kingdom) feature characters who.are often read by audiences as featuring characteristics that are symptomatic of autism. These cultural references provide an opportunity and a language to discuss such characteristics, and to understand how to accommodate them socially and in classrooms. This is a strategy that I have used to initiate conversations about the traits and learning needs of students on the spectrum with both my university colleagues and pre-service teachers at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • McMahon-Coleman, K. (2017). Teaching little Professors: Autism Spectrum on TV and in the Classroom. In E. Janak & L. A. Sourdot (Eds.), Educating through Popular Culture: You're Not Cool Just Because You Teach with Comics (pp. 145-160). United Kingdom: Lexington Books.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781498549172

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/asdpapers/699

Book Title


  • Educating through Popular Culture: You're Not Cool Just Because You Teach with Comics

Start Page


  • 145

End Page


  • 160

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom