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Women writing war: Ireland 1880-1922 [Book Review]

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Written within the Decade of Centenaries commemorating modern Ireland’s engagement with violent conflict (1912-1922), Women Writing War gathers together a series of studies of Irish women’s writings about war: from the Land Wars to the Boer War to the violent campaigns of the revolutionary years (1916, the War of Independence, and the Civil War). In doing so, it continues the work of feminist scholars like Sarah Benton in the 1990s and Lisa Weihman in the 2000s who have investigated the roles and experiences of Irish women in militarised politics, thereby countering the historical amnesia about women’s contributions to nationalist activism in the Irish Free State. The difference is that whereas previous recoveries of revolutionary women’s histories were few, this book is published amid what Margaret Ward says is a proliferation of feminist scholarship prompted by the national commemorations (‘Preface’ to the collection). Ward states that there is now ‘a hunger to know more’ that is exemplified through writing that uses new methodologies or sources to open up new histories or adopts new approaches to cast fresh light on familiar stories to create a growing body of innovative feminist scholarship. (Here, we can think of the recent contributions of scholars like Margaret Ward, Louise Ryan, Senia Pašeta, Sinéad McCoole, Ann Matthews, and Karen Steele, among others.)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Crozier-De Rosa, S. M. (2017). Women writing war: Ireland 1880-1922 [Book Review]. Australasian Journal of Irish Studies, 17 171-174.

Number Of Pages


  • 3

Start Page


  • 171

End Page


  • 174

Volume


  • 17

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Written within the Decade of Centenaries commemorating modern Ireland’s engagement with violent conflict (1912-1922), Women Writing War gathers together a series of studies of Irish women’s writings about war: from the Land Wars to the Boer War to the violent campaigns of the revolutionary years (1916, the War of Independence, and the Civil War). In doing so, it continues the work of feminist scholars like Sarah Benton in the 1990s and Lisa Weihman in the 2000s who have investigated the roles and experiences of Irish women in militarised politics, thereby countering the historical amnesia about women’s contributions to nationalist activism in the Irish Free State. The difference is that whereas previous recoveries of revolutionary women’s histories were few, this book is published amid what Margaret Ward says is a proliferation of feminist scholarship prompted by the national commemorations (‘Preface’ to the collection). Ward states that there is now ‘a hunger to know more’ that is exemplified through writing that uses new methodologies or sources to open up new histories or adopts new approaches to cast fresh light on familiar stories to create a growing body of innovative feminist scholarship. (Here, we can think of the recent contributions of scholars like Margaret Ward, Louise Ryan, Senia Pašeta, Sinéad McCoole, Ann Matthews, and Karen Steele, among others.)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Crozier-De Rosa, S. M. (2017). Women writing war: Ireland 1880-1922 [Book Review]. Australasian Journal of Irish Studies, 17 171-174.

Number Of Pages


  • 3

Start Page


  • 171

End Page


  • 174

Volume


  • 17

Place Of Publication


  • Australia