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The built environment and sexual and reproductive health

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Australia’s first Federal Minister for Cities and the Built Environment, Jamie Briggs, resigned after only 99 days. In 2016, The role was downgraded to Assistant Minister for Cities and Digital Transformation. The original 2015 appointment had been met with enthusiasm from many in the health sector who propose that the characteristics of the places where we live are fundamental causes of health inequity in society.1 Features of the built environment that shape behaviour include access to safe places for physical activity, infrastructure for active travel, and a food environment for making healthier dietary choices.2 Features of the built environment such as parks and green spaces can promote social, cultural, mental/psychological and physical wellbeing.3 Improved wellbeing influences our physical health, as well as other essentials such as productivity.2,3 Without necessarily being aware of the consequences of our actions, by building cities, we have fundamentally shaped the health and quality of life of generations. The Rockefeller Foundation–Lancet Commission on planetary health posits that “the unparalleled public health, agricultural, industrial, and technical advancements of the 20th century...is taking a heavy toll on the Earth’s natural systems...in ways that are actually undermining our well-being.”4 The loss of federal leadership in these areas stunts possibilities for interrogating the built environment and its impacts on health and wellbeing across a range of areas.5

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Dune, T., Astell-Burt, T. & Firdaus, R. (2017). The built environment and sexual and reproductive health. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 41 (5), 458-459.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85023644444

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 458

End Page


  • 459

Volume


  • 41

Issue


  • 5

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Australia’s first Federal Minister for Cities and the Built Environment, Jamie Briggs, resigned after only 99 days. In 2016, The role was downgraded to Assistant Minister for Cities and Digital Transformation. The original 2015 appointment had been met with enthusiasm from many in the health sector who propose that the characteristics of the places where we live are fundamental causes of health inequity in society.1 Features of the built environment that shape behaviour include access to safe places for physical activity, infrastructure for active travel, and a food environment for making healthier dietary choices.2 Features of the built environment such as parks and green spaces can promote social, cultural, mental/psychological and physical wellbeing.3 Improved wellbeing influences our physical health, as well as other essentials such as productivity.2,3 Without necessarily being aware of the consequences of our actions, by building cities, we have fundamentally shaped the health and quality of life of generations. The Rockefeller Foundation–Lancet Commission on planetary health posits that “the unparalleled public health, agricultural, industrial, and technical advancements of the 20th century...is taking a heavy toll on the Earth’s natural systems...in ways that are actually undermining our well-being.”4 The loss of federal leadership in these areas stunts possibilities for interrogating the built environment and its impacts on health and wellbeing across a range of areas.5

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Dune, T., Astell-Burt, T. & Firdaus, R. (2017). The built environment and sexual and reproductive health. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 41 (5), 458-459.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85023644444

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 458

End Page


  • 459

Volume


  • 41

Issue


  • 5

Place Of Publication


  • Australia