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A comparison of upper limb movement profiles when reaching to virtual and real targets using the Oculus Rift: implications for virtual-reality enhanced stroke rehabilitation

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Recent innovations in the field of virtual reality, such as the Oculus Rift head mounted display, provide an unparalleled level of immersion in the virtual world at a cost which is rapidly approaching mainstream availability. Utilising virtual reality has been shown to improve many facets of the rehabilitation process, including patient motivation and participation. These systems, however, do not enable the user to receive feedback when interacting with virtual objects, which may influence the movement profile of a patient. Therefore, to investigate how a virtual environment influences movements during stance, participants were required to reach to a real and a virtual target. Their movements were quantified using a motion capture suit, and the virtual target was generated using the Oculus Rift. The motions to both targets were compared using a number of measures calculated to characterize the velocity profiles.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • M. A. Just, P. J. Stapley, M. Ros, F. Naghdy & D. Stirling, "A comparison of upper limb movement profiles when reaching to virtual and real targets using the Oculus Rift: implications for virtual-reality enhanced stroke rehabilitation," in 10th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies (ICDVRAT 2014): Proceedings, 2014, pp. 325-328.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers1/372

Start Page


  • 325

End Page


  • 328

Place Of Publication


  • Reading, United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Recent innovations in the field of virtual reality, such as the Oculus Rift head mounted display, provide an unparalleled level of immersion in the virtual world at a cost which is rapidly approaching mainstream availability. Utilising virtual reality has been shown to improve many facets of the rehabilitation process, including patient motivation and participation. These systems, however, do not enable the user to receive feedback when interacting with virtual objects, which may influence the movement profile of a patient. Therefore, to investigate how a virtual environment influences movements during stance, participants were required to reach to a real and a virtual target. Their movements were quantified using a motion capture suit, and the virtual target was generated using the Oculus Rift. The motions to both targets were compared using a number of measures calculated to characterize the velocity profiles.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • M. A. Just, P. J. Stapley, M. Ros, F. Naghdy & D. Stirling, "A comparison of upper limb movement profiles when reaching to virtual and real targets using the Oculus Rift: implications for virtual-reality enhanced stroke rehabilitation," in 10th International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies (ICDVRAT 2014): Proceedings, 2014, pp. 325-328.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers1/372

Start Page


  • 325

End Page


  • 328

Place Of Publication


  • Reading, United Kingdom