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Healing at Home: Developing a Model for Ambulatory Alcohol “Detox” in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Indigenous Peoples who have been colonized typically face a greater burden of injury,

    disease, and social disruption associated with alcohol use (Kirmayer, Brass, & Tait, 2000).

    However, they often also encounter many barriers to accessing treatment for alcohol use

    disorders (Gray, Stearne, Wilson, & Doyle, 2010). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

    Australians (here described as Aboriginal Australians) experience 3–8 times the prevalence of

    alcohol-related illness, injury, and death than the general population (Calabria, Doran, Vos,

    Shakeshaft, & Hall, 2010). But their barriers to treatment access for alcohol dependence include

    transport difficulties, fear of discrimination, and lack of culturally secure services (Brett et al.,

    2016; Conigrave et al., 2012; Gray, Stearne, et al., 2010; Teasdale et al., 2008).

UOW Authors


  •   Brett, Jonathan (external author)
  •   Dawson, Angela (external author)
  •   Ivers, Rowena
  •   Lawrence, Leanne (external author)
  •   Barclay, Sarah (external author)
  •   Conigrave, Kate M. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Brett, J., Dawson, A., Ivers, R., Lawrence, L., Barclay, S. & Conigrave, K. (2017). Healing at Home: Developing a Model for Ambulatory Alcohol “Detox” in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service. International Journal of Indigenous Health, 12 (1), 24-38.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5803&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4765

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 24

End Page


  • 38

Volume


  • 12

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • Canada

Abstract


  • Indigenous Peoples who have been colonized typically face a greater burden of injury,

    disease, and social disruption associated with alcohol use (Kirmayer, Brass, & Tait, 2000).

    However, they often also encounter many barriers to accessing treatment for alcohol use

    disorders (Gray, Stearne, Wilson, & Doyle, 2010). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

    Australians (here described as Aboriginal Australians) experience 3–8 times the prevalence of

    alcohol-related illness, injury, and death than the general population (Calabria, Doran, Vos,

    Shakeshaft, & Hall, 2010). But their barriers to treatment access for alcohol dependence include

    transport difficulties, fear of discrimination, and lack of culturally secure services (Brett et al.,

    2016; Conigrave et al., 2012; Gray, Stearne, et al., 2010; Teasdale et al., 2008).

UOW Authors


  •   Brett, Jonathan (external author)
  •   Dawson, Angela (external author)
  •   Ivers, Rowena
  •   Lawrence, Leanne (external author)
  •   Barclay, Sarah (external author)
  •   Conigrave, Kate M. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Brett, J., Dawson, A., Ivers, R., Lawrence, L., Barclay, S. & Conigrave, K. (2017). Healing at Home: Developing a Model for Ambulatory Alcohol “Detox” in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service. International Journal of Indigenous Health, 12 (1), 24-38.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5803&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4765

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 24

End Page


  • 38

Volume


  • 12

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • Canada