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Three arcs: observations on the archaeology of the Elands Bay and northern Cederberg landscapes

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • The area around Elands Bay and the adjacent interior landscapes west of the Doring River have been

    subject to intense archaeological investigation over the last ~50 years. The result is a region with great depth

    and diversity of archaeological information. In this paper I discuss three general observations that arise

    from the integration of data across this region. The first is that redundancy in site occupation is limited:

    even where many sites are excavated in a small area, understanding of the regional sequence cannot be

    assumed to be complete. The second is that humans did not live in rock shelters: a focus on rock shelters

    alone, even where these are abundant, produces a skewed picture of occupational and demographic

    histories. The third is that the coast and its hinterland are intimately bound: interaction between the two

    zones is variable, and even where it is limited this observation is important to the understanding of both.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Mackay, A. (2016). Three arcs: observations on the archaeology of the Elands Bay and northern Cederberg landscapes. Southern African Humanities, 29 1-15.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5737&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4711

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 15

Volume


  • 29

Abstract


  • The area around Elands Bay and the adjacent interior landscapes west of the Doring River have been

    subject to intense archaeological investigation over the last ~50 years. The result is a region with great depth

    and diversity of archaeological information. In this paper I discuss three general observations that arise

    from the integration of data across this region. The first is that redundancy in site occupation is limited:

    even where many sites are excavated in a small area, understanding of the regional sequence cannot be

    assumed to be complete. The second is that humans did not live in rock shelters: a focus on rock shelters

    alone, even where these are abundant, produces a skewed picture of occupational and demographic

    histories. The third is that the coast and its hinterland are intimately bound: interaction between the two

    zones is variable, and even where it is limited this observation is important to the understanding of both.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Mackay, A. (2016). Three arcs: observations on the archaeology of the Elands Bay and northern Cederberg landscapes. Southern African Humanities, 29 1-15.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5737&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4711

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 15

Volume


  • 29