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Unhealthy food marketing to New Zealand children and adolescents through the internet

Journal Article


Abstract


  • AIM: To assess the extent and nature of unhealthy food marketing to New Zealand children and adolescents through the internet.METHODS: Internet traffic data for January 2014 was purchased from AC Nielsen to identify the most popular websites (n=110) among children and adolescents aged 6-17 years. In addition, websites (n=70) of food and beverage brands most frequently marketed to children through television, sports, magazines and Facebook were included. Marketing techniques and features on those websites were analysed.RESULTS: The extent of food marketing on popular non-food websites was low. A wide range of marketing techniques and features was, however, identified on food brand websites, including advercation (87%), viral marketing (64%), cookies (54%), free downloadable items (43%), promotional characters (39%), designated children's sections (19%) and advergaming (13%). Most techniques appeared more frequently on websites specifically targeting children and adolescents, than on other websites targeting the general public.CONCLUSION: Compared to traditional media, the internet allows food marketers to use engaging techniques to directly interact with children. While the range of marketing techniques and features identified on food brand websites was extensive, the most popular websites among children and adolescents were non-food related, and the extent of food marketing on those websites was found to be low. Additional assessment of food marketing to children through social and other digital media is recommended.

Authors


  •   Vandevijvere, Stefanie (external author)
  •   Sagar, Karuna (external author)
  •   Kelly, Bridget
  •   Swinburn, Boyd A. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Vandevijvere, S., Sagar, K., Kelly, B. & Swinburn, B. (2017). Unhealthy food marketing to New Zealand children and adolescents through the internet. New Zealand Medical Journal, 130 (1450), 32-43.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85017556953

Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 32

End Page


  • 43

Volume


  • 130

Issue


  • 1450

Place Of Publication


  • New Zealand

Abstract


  • AIM: To assess the extent and nature of unhealthy food marketing to New Zealand children and adolescents through the internet.METHODS: Internet traffic data for January 2014 was purchased from AC Nielsen to identify the most popular websites (n=110) among children and adolescents aged 6-17 years. In addition, websites (n=70) of food and beverage brands most frequently marketed to children through television, sports, magazines and Facebook were included. Marketing techniques and features on those websites were analysed.RESULTS: The extent of food marketing on popular non-food websites was low. A wide range of marketing techniques and features was, however, identified on food brand websites, including advercation (87%), viral marketing (64%), cookies (54%), free downloadable items (43%), promotional characters (39%), designated children's sections (19%) and advergaming (13%). Most techniques appeared more frequently on websites specifically targeting children and adolescents, than on other websites targeting the general public.CONCLUSION: Compared to traditional media, the internet allows food marketers to use engaging techniques to directly interact with children. While the range of marketing techniques and features identified on food brand websites was extensive, the most popular websites among children and adolescents were non-food related, and the extent of food marketing on those websites was found to be low. Additional assessment of food marketing to children through social and other digital media is recommended.

Authors


  •   Vandevijvere, Stefanie (external author)
  •   Sagar, Karuna (external author)
  •   Kelly, Bridget
  •   Swinburn, Boyd A. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Vandevijvere, S., Sagar, K., Kelly, B. & Swinburn, B. (2017). Unhealthy food marketing to New Zealand children and adolescents through the internet. New Zealand Medical Journal, 130 (1450), 32-43.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85017556953

Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 32

End Page


  • 43

Volume


  • 130

Issue


  • 1450

Place Of Publication


  • New Zealand