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Preliminary Exploration of Psychologists¿ Knowledge and Perceptions of Electronic Security and Implications for Use of Technology-Assisted Supervision

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Technology is increasingly used in the provision of psychology services, and technology-assisted supervision may offer improved access, convenience, and cost efficiencies in supervision settings, as well as augmenting and extending traditional supervision tools. The successful implementation and uptake of technology in supervision and training may be impacted by psychologists¿ understanding of digital security mechanisms and their perception of risk associated with new technologies. Method: Twenty-five psychologists completed a survey exploring knowledge of e-security, perceptions of risk associated with different behaviours in both digital and more traditional working contexts, and the extent to which they engaged in these behaviours. Comfort and willingness to utilise new supervision technologies was also assessed. Results: Results reveal a perceived lack of understanding of electronic security mechanisms. Comparisons of perceived risk between physical and equivalent digitally managed information were rated as similar. Psychologists tend to engage in higher perceived risk behaviours less often, although there are some clear discrepancies. Greater knowledge of e-security was associated with less comfort in using new supervision technologies. Conclusions: User perceptions of risk may impact the uptake of potentially useful technologies that support supervision. Education in the implementation of appropriate digital security mechanisms is recommended, coupled with further research to understand barriers associated with greater knowledge of security risks.

UOW Authors


  •   Blackman, Russell J. (external author)
  •   Deane, Frank
  •   Gonsalvez, Craig J. (external author)
  •   Saffioti, Daniel F. F. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Blackman, R., Deane, F., Gonsalvez, C. & Saffioti, D. (2017). Preliminary Exploration of Psychologists¿ Knowledge and Perceptions of Electronic Security and Implications for Use of Technology-Assisted Supervision. Australian Psychologist, 52 (2), 155-161.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85015913536

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2979

Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 155

End Page


  • 161

Volume


  • 52

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Technology is increasingly used in the provision of psychology services, and technology-assisted supervision may offer improved access, convenience, and cost efficiencies in supervision settings, as well as augmenting and extending traditional supervision tools. The successful implementation and uptake of technology in supervision and training may be impacted by psychologists¿ understanding of digital security mechanisms and their perception of risk associated with new technologies. Method: Twenty-five psychologists completed a survey exploring knowledge of e-security, perceptions of risk associated with different behaviours in both digital and more traditional working contexts, and the extent to which they engaged in these behaviours. Comfort and willingness to utilise new supervision technologies was also assessed. Results: Results reveal a perceived lack of understanding of electronic security mechanisms. Comparisons of perceived risk between physical and equivalent digitally managed information were rated as similar. Psychologists tend to engage in higher perceived risk behaviours less often, although there are some clear discrepancies. Greater knowledge of e-security was associated with less comfort in using new supervision technologies. Conclusions: User perceptions of risk may impact the uptake of potentially useful technologies that support supervision. Education in the implementation of appropriate digital security mechanisms is recommended, coupled with further research to understand barriers associated with greater knowledge of security risks.

UOW Authors


  •   Blackman, Russell J. (external author)
  •   Deane, Frank
  •   Gonsalvez, Craig J. (external author)
  •   Saffioti, Daniel F. F. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Blackman, R., Deane, F., Gonsalvez, C. & Saffioti, D. (2017). Preliminary Exploration of Psychologists¿ Knowledge and Perceptions of Electronic Security and Implications for Use of Technology-Assisted Supervision. Australian Psychologist, 52 (2), 155-161.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85015913536

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2979

Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 155

End Page


  • 161

Volume


  • 52

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom