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Development of visual information sampling in road traffic situations

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Each year 270000 pedestrians die of road traffic and millions are injured (WHO, 2011). Despite

    children being largely over-represented in casualties, little is known about the perceptual processes

    used by children for judgments typically made as a pedestrian. In the present study, we addressed

    two crucial questions: 1- In road-crossing situations, are children more influenced than adults by

    specific social and visual saliency features, 2- how does this influence change with age?We recorded

    the eye-movements of more than 100 children from 5 to 14 years-old and 30 adults while they were

    watching road-traffic videos on screen and performing a road-crossing decision task. Linear-mixed

    models showed a strong age effect on crossing decisions and clustering techniques isolated 5–9

    years-old children as more likely to cross the road in short gaps. Young children also showed

    difficulties in inhibiting reflexive orientation responses towards traffic irrelevant distractors.

    Statistical mapping of eye-movements identified the social and visual saliency features leading to

    the strongest orientation responses. Our data offer a novel fine-grained description of the visuospatial

    processes of children’s engaged in road-traffic situations. These findings have a profound

    impact on the understanding of the visual system and road safety issues.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Caldara, J. G. & Miellet, S. R. (2016). Development of visual information sampling in road traffic situations. 39th European Conference on Visual Perception

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2859

Abstract


  • Each year 270000 pedestrians die of road traffic and millions are injured (WHO, 2011). Despite

    children being largely over-represented in casualties, little is known about the perceptual processes

    used by children for judgments typically made as a pedestrian. In the present study, we addressed

    two crucial questions: 1- In road-crossing situations, are children more influenced than adults by

    specific social and visual saliency features, 2- how does this influence change with age?We recorded

    the eye-movements of more than 100 children from 5 to 14 years-old and 30 adults while they were

    watching road-traffic videos on screen and performing a road-crossing decision task. Linear-mixed

    models showed a strong age effect on crossing decisions and clustering techniques isolated 5–9

    years-old children as more likely to cross the road in short gaps. Young children also showed

    difficulties in inhibiting reflexive orientation responses towards traffic irrelevant distractors.

    Statistical mapping of eye-movements identified the social and visual saliency features leading to

    the strongest orientation responses. Our data offer a novel fine-grained description of the visuospatial

    processes of children’s engaged in road-traffic situations. These findings have a profound

    impact on the understanding of the visual system and road safety issues.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Caldara, J. G. & Miellet, S. R. (2016). Development of visual information sampling in road traffic situations. 39th European Conference on Visual Perception

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2859