Skip to main content
placeholder image

Modelling changes of coastal wetlands responding to disturbance regimes (Eastern Australia)

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • 86% of Australians live along the coast. Yet recent stressors and challenges of degradation

    have been raised as natural processes in coastal zones are altered by high energy events such

    as sea level rise. Which have caused loss of the coastal ecosystems, particularly within coastal

    wetland which are the most sensitive and response-able coastal ecosystem of any pressures.

    Modelling modifications to natural processes is important. Thus, Comerong Island (Southeast

    NSW) represents an ideal example of this context that reflecting disturbance regimes.

    The measurable parameters of multi-temporal changes are Land Cover, Shorelines and

    sediment delivery using remote sensing data, GIS analysis, XRD, grain size and loss on ignition.

    Results show there are significant changes of vegetation and shoreline in wetlands of

    Comerong Island over time, including northern accretion (408344.46m2), eastern, middle and

    southern erosion (727626.25m2) of the Island.

    With an eco-geomorphological context, such insights about the nature of changes in coastal

    wetlands are useful for sustainable risk assessment and management. The framework

    demonstrated here for quantifying the current stressors of coastal wetlands could represents

    an approach that could be profitably applied worldwide.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Al-Nasrawi, A., Jones, B. & Hamylton, S. (2015). Modelling changes of coastal wetlands responding to disturbance regimes (Eastern Australia). Australian Mangrove and Saltmarsh Network Conference : Working with Mangrove and Saltmarsh for Sustainable Outcomes (pp. 33-33). Wollongong, Australia: Australian Mangrove and Saltmarsh Network.

Start Page


  • 33

End Page


  • 33

Abstract


  • 86% of Australians live along the coast. Yet recent stressors and challenges of degradation

    have been raised as natural processes in coastal zones are altered by high energy events such

    as sea level rise. Which have caused loss of the coastal ecosystems, particularly within coastal

    wetland which are the most sensitive and response-able coastal ecosystem of any pressures.

    Modelling modifications to natural processes is important. Thus, Comerong Island (Southeast

    NSW) represents an ideal example of this context that reflecting disturbance regimes.

    The measurable parameters of multi-temporal changes are Land Cover, Shorelines and

    sediment delivery using remote sensing data, GIS analysis, XRD, grain size and loss on ignition.

    Results show there are significant changes of vegetation and shoreline in wetlands of

    Comerong Island over time, including northern accretion (408344.46m2), eastern, middle and

    southern erosion (727626.25m2) of the Island.

    With an eco-geomorphological context, such insights about the nature of changes in coastal

    wetlands are useful for sustainable risk assessment and management. The framework

    demonstrated here for quantifying the current stressors of coastal wetlands could represents

    an approach that could be profitably applied worldwide.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Al-Nasrawi, A., Jones, B. & Hamylton, S. (2015). Modelling changes of coastal wetlands responding to disturbance regimes (Eastern Australia). Australian Mangrove and Saltmarsh Network Conference : Working with Mangrove and Saltmarsh for Sustainable Outcomes (pp. 33-33). Wollongong, Australia: Australian Mangrove and Saltmarsh Network.

Start Page


  • 33

End Page


  • 33