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First-in-Family Students, University Experience and Family Life: Motivations, Transitions and Participation

Book


Abstract


  • Universities attract students from a diversity of backgrounds, but access

    and participation are not equal for all student cohorts. Indeed, when we

    consider access and participation rates across countries, inequality of access

    is pronounced (Abbott-Chapman 2006; James 2008; Forsyth and Furlong

    2003; Schuetze and Slowey 2002). For students who are first-in-family

    (FiF) to come to university these statistics are particularly negative, with

    poorer educational outcomes recorded internationally (ABS 2013; Harrell

    and Forney 2003; Lehmann 2009). This group is statistically less likely to

    attend university and even after enrolment perform poorly when compared

    to their second- or third-generation peers (HEFCE 2010). Within

    Australia, 26 per cent of this cohort is reported as considering leaving

    university in the first year of university study, a figure that increases to 34

    per cent for later-year students (Coates and Ransom 2011). These results

    have been explained in general terms, for example, the FiF students in

    Coates and Ransom’s Australian study who reported departure intentions,

    perceived the university as unsupportive or failing to ‘help them cope with

    non-academic responsibilities’ (p. 14). Despite policy initiatives designed

    to increase university participation, these types of explanations tell us little

    about what is needed to improve educational outcomes for FiF students.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • O'Shea, S., May, J., Stone, C. & Delahunty, J. (2017). First-in-Family Students, University Experience and Family Life: Motivations, Transitions and Participation. United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781137582836

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85047057331

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2921

Number Of Pages


  • 223

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Universities attract students from a diversity of backgrounds, but access

    and participation are not equal for all student cohorts. Indeed, when we

    consider access and participation rates across countries, inequality of access

    is pronounced (Abbott-Chapman 2006; James 2008; Forsyth and Furlong

    2003; Schuetze and Slowey 2002). For students who are first-in-family

    (FiF) to come to university these statistics are particularly negative, with

    poorer educational outcomes recorded internationally (ABS 2013; Harrell

    and Forney 2003; Lehmann 2009). This group is statistically less likely to

    attend university and even after enrolment perform poorly when compared

    to their second- or third-generation peers (HEFCE 2010). Within

    Australia, 26 per cent of this cohort is reported as considering leaving

    university in the first year of university study, a figure that increases to 34

    per cent for later-year students (Coates and Ransom 2011). These results

    have been explained in general terms, for example, the FiF students in

    Coates and Ransom’s Australian study who reported departure intentions,

    perceived the university as unsupportive or failing to ‘help them cope with

    non-academic responsibilities’ (p. 14). Despite policy initiatives designed

    to increase university participation, these types of explanations tell us little

    about what is needed to improve educational outcomes for FiF students.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • O'Shea, S., May, J., Stone, C. & Delahunty, J. (2017). First-in-Family Students, University Experience and Family Life: Motivations, Transitions and Participation. United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781137582836

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85047057331

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2921

Number Of Pages


  • 223

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom