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Supporting early vocabulary development: what sort of responsiveness matters?

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Maternal responsiveness is a multi dimensional construct that has been positively related to

    the infant’s later socio-emotional and cognitive development including a variety of language

    outcomes (Tamis–LeMonda, Bornstein & Baumwell, 2001). Encompassing “prompt, contingent

    and appropriate” responses (Bornstein & Tamis-LeMonda (1989)), a substantial body

    of research has sought to deconstruct this concept by considering different aspects of infant

    directed speech and interaction style. Drawing on an existing longitudinal dataset of naturalistic

    video-recorded dyadic interaction (DePaolis & Keren-Portnoy, under revision), maternal

    responsiveness toward their 9.5 month old infants was considered in relation to expressive

    vocabulary at 18 months. Three dimensions of responsiveness were operationalised:

    Semantic responsiveness: maternal utterances that referred to the infant’s current focus of

    attention; Temporal responsiveness: maternal utterances occurring within two seconds of an

    infant vocalisation; Temporal and semantic responsiveness: semantically appropriate utterances

    occurring within two seconds of an infant vocalisation. Mothers who responded more

    often to their infant’s vocalisations tended to do so in a semantically appropriate manner, however, only utterances that were both semantically appropriate and temporally linked to

    an infant vocalisation were related to later expressive vocabulary development. Regression

    analysis revealed that prompt and semantically appropriate maternal language at 9.5 months

    was a significant predicator of expressive vocabulary at 18 months. This finding underlines the

    dyadic nature of the responsiveness construct and draws attention to the importance of early

    vocalisations as potential markers of infant attention. Further coding and analysis will consider

    other aspects of infant directed speech alongside non-verbal markers of infant attention.

Authors


  •   McGillion, Michelle (external author)
  •   Herbert, Jane S.
  •   Pine, Julian (external author)
  •   Vihman, Marilyn (external author)
  •   Keren-Portnoy, Tamar (external author)
  •   Matthews, Danielle (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • McGillion, M., Herbert, J., Pine, J., Vihman, M., Keren-Portnoy, T. & Matthews, D. (2013). Supporting early vocabulary development: what sort of responsiveness matters?. BCCCD 2013 Budapest CEU Conference on Cognitive Development Program and Abstracts (pp. 165-166).

Start Page


  • 165

End Page


  • 166

Abstract


  • Maternal responsiveness is a multi dimensional construct that has been positively related to

    the infant’s later socio-emotional and cognitive development including a variety of language

    outcomes (Tamis–LeMonda, Bornstein & Baumwell, 2001). Encompassing “prompt, contingent

    and appropriate” responses (Bornstein & Tamis-LeMonda (1989)), a substantial body

    of research has sought to deconstruct this concept by considering different aspects of infant

    directed speech and interaction style. Drawing on an existing longitudinal dataset of naturalistic

    video-recorded dyadic interaction (DePaolis & Keren-Portnoy, under revision), maternal

    responsiveness toward their 9.5 month old infants was considered in relation to expressive

    vocabulary at 18 months. Three dimensions of responsiveness were operationalised:

    Semantic responsiveness: maternal utterances that referred to the infant’s current focus of

    attention; Temporal responsiveness: maternal utterances occurring within two seconds of an

    infant vocalisation; Temporal and semantic responsiveness: semantically appropriate utterances

    occurring within two seconds of an infant vocalisation. Mothers who responded more

    often to their infant’s vocalisations tended to do so in a semantically appropriate manner, however, only utterances that were both semantically appropriate and temporally linked to

    an infant vocalisation were related to later expressive vocabulary development. Regression

    analysis revealed that prompt and semantically appropriate maternal language at 9.5 months

    was a significant predicator of expressive vocabulary at 18 months. This finding underlines the

    dyadic nature of the responsiveness construct and draws attention to the importance of early

    vocalisations as potential markers of infant attention. Further coding and analysis will consider

    other aspects of infant directed speech alongside non-verbal markers of infant attention.

Authors


  •   McGillion, Michelle (external author)
  •   Herbert, Jane S.
  •   Pine, Julian (external author)
  •   Vihman, Marilyn (external author)
  •   Keren-Portnoy, Tamar (external author)
  •   Matthews, Danielle (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • McGillion, M., Herbert, J., Pine, J., Vihman, M., Keren-Portnoy, T. & Matthews, D. (2013). Supporting early vocabulary development: what sort of responsiveness matters?. BCCCD 2013 Budapest CEU Conference on Cognitive Development Program and Abstracts (pp. 165-166).

Start Page


  • 165

End Page


  • 166