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A step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Objectives: This article discusses why personality change appears both possible and beneficial, and provides a step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching. Objectives: This article discusses why personality change appears both possible and beneficial, and provides a step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a panel of coaches/psychologists (experts), in order to develop coaching interventions to increase or decrease each of the 30 facets within the NEO PI-R. Further consultation with a sub-group of this panel led to the development of a step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching, designed to facilitate client chosen personality change goals. Results: A step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching was developed, and related coach training material. The step-wise process proposed that personality change coaching of individuals without major psychopathology be conducted in a coaching context. Prerequisites included client awareness of their personality, and motivation to change one or more personality facets. The step-wise process incorporated a 10-step coaching sequence to facilitate change in this context, and utilised a menu of unique change interventions for each of the 30 NEO PI-R facets. Conclusion: Personality change coaching appears both feasible and beneficial in a coaching context. The stepwise process discussed in this article informs coaching practice, and provides a foundation for empirical exploration of this potential.

UOW Authors


  •   Martin, Sue S. (external author)
  •   Oades, Lindsay G. (external author)
  •   Caputi, Peter

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Martin, L. S., Oades, L. G. & Caputi, P. (2014). A step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching. International Coaching Psychology Review, 9 (2), 167-181.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/gsbpapers/475

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 167

End Page


  • 181

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • Objectives: This article discusses why personality change appears both possible and beneficial, and provides a step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching. Objectives: This article discusses why personality change appears both possible and beneficial, and provides a step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a panel of coaches/psychologists (experts), in order to develop coaching interventions to increase or decrease each of the 30 facets within the NEO PI-R. Further consultation with a sub-group of this panel led to the development of a step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching, designed to facilitate client chosen personality change goals. Results: A step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching was developed, and related coach training material. The step-wise process proposed that personality change coaching of individuals without major psychopathology be conducted in a coaching context. Prerequisites included client awareness of their personality, and motivation to change one or more personality facets. The step-wise process incorporated a 10-step coaching sequence to facilitate change in this context, and utilised a menu of unique change interventions for each of the 30 NEO PI-R facets. Conclusion: Personality change coaching appears both feasible and beneficial in a coaching context. The stepwise process discussed in this article informs coaching practice, and provides a foundation for empirical exploration of this potential.

UOW Authors


  •   Martin, Sue S. (external author)
  •   Oades, Lindsay G. (external author)
  •   Caputi, Peter

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Martin, L. S., Oades, L. G. & Caputi, P. (2014). A step-wise process of intentional personality change coaching. International Coaching Psychology Review, 9 (2), 167-181.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/gsbpapers/475

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 167

End Page


  • 181

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 2