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Intentional personality change coaching: A randomised controlled trial of participant selected personality facet change using the Five-Factor Model of Personality

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Objectives: Recent literature suggests that personality may be more amenable to change than was previously thought, and that participant selected intentional personality change may be beneficial. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 10-week structured intentional personality change coaching programme on participant selected personality facets. Design: Participants were assigned to the personality coaching group or a waitlist control group using a waitlist control, matched, randomised procedure (personality coaching group, N=27; waitlist control group, N=27). Method: A structured coaching programme, designed to identify and modify a limited number of personality facets, chosen by the client, was employed. Results: Participation in the personality change coaching programme was associated with significant positive change in participant selected facets, with gains maintained three months later. Neither age of participant nor number of facets targeted significantly affected change outcomes. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a structured personality change coaching programme may facilitate beneficial personality change in motivated individuals.

UOW Authors


  •   Martin, Sue S. (external author)
  •   Oades, Lindsay G. (external author)
  •   Caputi, Peter

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Martin, L. S., Oades, L. G. & Caputi, P. (2014). Intentional personality change coaching: A randomised controlled trial of participant selected personality facet change using the Five-Factor Model of Personality. International Coaching Psychology Review, 9 (2), 196-209.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/gsbpapers/474

Number Of Pages


  • 13

Start Page


  • 196

End Page


  • 209

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • Objectives: Recent literature suggests that personality may be more amenable to change than was previously thought, and that participant selected intentional personality change may be beneficial. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 10-week structured intentional personality change coaching programme on participant selected personality facets. Design: Participants were assigned to the personality coaching group or a waitlist control group using a waitlist control, matched, randomised procedure (personality coaching group, N=27; waitlist control group, N=27). Method: A structured coaching programme, designed to identify and modify a limited number of personality facets, chosen by the client, was employed. Results: Participation in the personality change coaching programme was associated with significant positive change in participant selected facets, with gains maintained three months later. Neither age of participant nor number of facets targeted significantly affected change outcomes. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a structured personality change coaching programme may facilitate beneficial personality change in motivated individuals.

UOW Authors


  •   Martin, Sue S. (external author)
  •   Oades, Lindsay G. (external author)
  •   Caputi, Peter

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Martin, L. S., Oades, L. G. & Caputi, P. (2014). Intentional personality change coaching: A randomised controlled trial of participant selected personality facet change using the Five-Factor Model of Personality. International Coaching Psychology Review, 9 (2), 196-209.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/gsbpapers/474

Number Of Pages


  • 13

Start Page


  • 196

End Page


  • 209

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 2