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Chronic rhein treatment improves recognition memory in high-fat diet-induced obese male mice

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • High-fat (HF) diet modulates gut microbiota and increases plasma concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which is associated with obesity and its related low-grade inflammation and cognitive decline. Rhein is the main ingredient of the rhubarb plant which has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent for several millennia. However, the potential effects of rhein against HF diet-induced obesity and its associated alteration of gut microbiota, inflammation and cognitive decline have not been studied. In this study, C57BL/6J male mice were fed an HF diet for 8 weeks to induce obesity, and then treated with oral rhein (120 mg/kg body weight/day in HF diet) for a further 6 weeks. Chronic rhein treatment prevented the HF diet-induced recognition memory impairment assessed by the novel object recognition test, neuroinflammation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficits in the perirhinal cortex. Furthermore, rhein inhibited the HF diet-induced increased plasma LPS level and the proinflammatory macrophage accumulation in the colon and alteration of microbiota, including decreasing Bacteroides–Prevotella spp. and Desulfovibrios spp. DNA and increasing Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. DNA. Moreover, rhein also reduced body weight and improved glucose tolerance in HF diet-induced obese mice. In conclusion, rhein improved recognition memory and prevented obesity in mice on a chronic HF diet. These beneficial effects occur via the modulation of microbiota, hypoendotoxinemia, inhibition of macrophage accumulation, anti-neuroinflammation and the improvement of BDNF expression. Therefore, supplementation with rhein-enriched food or herbal medicine could be beneficial as a preventive strategy for chronic HF diet-induced cognitive decline, microbiota alteration and neuroinflammation.

Authors


  •   Wang, Sen (external author)
  •   Huang, Xu-Feng
  •   Zhang, Peng (external author)
  •   Wang, Hongqin
  •   Zhang, Qingsheng (external author)
  •   Yu, Shijia (external author)
  •   Yu, Yinghua

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Wang, S., Huang, X., Zhang, P., Wang, H., Zhang, Q., Yu, S. & Yu, Y. (2016). Chronic rhein treatment improves recognition memory in high-fat diet-induced obese male mice. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, 36 42-50.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84983746074

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1926&context=ihmri

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ihmri/902

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 42

End Page


  • 50

Volume


  • 36

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • High-fat (HF) diet modulates gut microbiota and increases plasma concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which is associated with obesity and its related low-grade inflammation and cognitive decline. Rhein is the main ingredient of the rhubarb plant which has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent for several millennia. However, the potential effects of rhein against HF diet-induced obesity and its associated alteration of gut microbiota, inflammation and cognitive decline have not been studied. In this study, C57BL/6J male mice were fed an HF diet for 8 weeks to induce obesity, and then treated with oral rhein (120 mg/kg body weight/day in HF diet) for a further 6 weeks. Chronic rhein treatment prevented the HF diet-induced recognition memory impairment assessed by the novel object recognition test, neuroinflammation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficits in the perirhinal cortex. Furthermore, rhein inhibited the HF diet-induced increased plasma LPS level and the proinflammatory macrophage accumulation in the colon and alteration of microbiota, including decreasing Bacteroides–Prevotella spp. and Desulfovibrios spp. DNA and increasing Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. DNA. Moreover, rhein also reduced body weight and improved glucose tolerance in HF diet-induced obese mice. In conclusion, rhein improved recognition memory and prevented obesity in mice on a chronic HF diet. These beneficial effects occur via the modulation of microbiota, hypoendotoxinemia, inhibition of macrophage accumulation, anti-neuroinflammation and the improvement of BDNF expression. Therefore, supplementation with rhein-enriched food or herbal medicine could be beneficial as a preventive strategy for chronic HF diet-induced cognitive decline, microbiota alteration and neuroinflammation.

Authors


  •   Wang, Sen (external author)
  •   Huang, Xu-Feng
  •   Zhang, Peng (external author)
  •   Wang, Hongqin
  •   Zhang, Qingsheng (external author)
  •   Yu, Shijia (external author)
  •   Yu, Yinghua

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Wang, S., Huang, X., Zhang, P., Wang, H., Zhang, Q., Yu, S. & Yu, Y. (2016). Chronic rhein treatment improves recognition memory in high-fat diet-induced obese male mice. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, 36 42-50.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84983746074

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1926&context=ihmri

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ihmri/902

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 42

End Page


  • 50

Volume


  • 36

Place Of Publication


  • United States