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Feedback on second language pronunciation: A case study of EAP teachers’ beliefs and practices

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • In the modern English language classroom, teachers are often faced with the challenging task of supporting students to achieve comprehensible pronunciation, but many teachers limit or neglect giving students feedback on their pronunciation for a variety of reasons. This paper examines the case of five experienced English for Academic Purposes (EAP) instructors who strive to provide feedback on specific features of pronunciation that negatively affect students’ comprehensibility. Results derived from semi-structured interviews, classroom observations and stimulated recall interviews reveal that the teachers use similar approaches to select and provide feedback on problematic features of pronunciation. Naturally, these approaches sometimes differed to better suit their particular classroom needs. The paper concludes with a discussion of several practical solutions for providing corrective feedback and implications for teacher education programs.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Baker, A. & Burri, M. (2016). Feedback on second language pronunciation: A case study of EAP teachers’ beliefs and practices. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 41 (6), 1-19.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3450&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2449

Number Of Pages


  • 18

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 19

Volume


  • 41

Issue


  • 6

Abstract


  • In the modern English language classroom, teachers are often faced with the challenging task of supporting students to achieve comprehensible pronunciation, but many teachers limit or neglect giving students feedback on their pronunciation for a variety of reasons. This paper examines the case of five experienced English for Academic Purposes (EAP) instructors who strive to provide feedback on specific features of pronunciation that negatively affect students’ comprehensibility. Results derived from semi-structured interviews, classroom observations and stimulated recall interviews reveal that the teachers use similar approaches to select and provide feedback on problematic features of pronunciation. Naturally, these approaches sometimes differed to better suit their particular classroom needs. The paper concludes with a discussion of several practical solutions for providing corrective feedback and implications for teacher education programs.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Baker, A. & Burri, M. (2016). Feedback on second language pronunciation: A case study of EAP teachers’ beliefs and practices. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 41 (6), 1-19.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3450&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2449

Number Of Pages


  • 18

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 19

Volume


  • 41

Issue


  • 6