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An examination of envy and jealousy in nursing academia

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Aim To discuss envy and jealousy and how their positive and negative aspects among nurse academics affect the workplace.

    Background In nursing academia, jealousy and envy are common emotions, engendered by demands for high productivity, intense competition for limited resources, preferences for particular assignments and opportunities for promotions. When these feelings are moderate and part of everyday rivalry, competition and ambition benefit the organisation. However, jealousy and envy can have serious consequences including damaged relationships and communication, and the undermining of colleagues’ performance.

    Discussion Strategies are recommended to provide opportunities for self-reflection and consideration of how the workplace affects nursing academics’ wellbeing and professional performance.

    Conclusion Jealousy and envy can be damaging emotions in the workplace. The embittered, hostile person can undermine and damage relationships, disrupt teams and communication, and undermine organisational performance. Discussing the positive and negative effects of envy and jealousy provides an opportunity for nursing academics to self-reflect and to consider others and their own personal and professional performance.

    Implications for practice Understanding how jealousy and envy impact on the work environment, workplace relationships and individual/team performance is important especially for early career and seasoned nursing academics alike.

UOW Authors


  •   Cleary, Michelle (external author)
  •   Walter, Garry (external author)
  •   Halcomb, Elizabeth
  •   Lopez, Violeta (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Cleary, M., Walter, G., Halcomb, E. & Lopez, V. (2016). An examination of envy and jealousy in nursing academia. Nurse Researcher, 23 (6), 14-19.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84980416270

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4084

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 14

End Page


  • 19

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Aim To discuss envy and jealousy and how their positive and negative aspects among nurse academics affect the workplace.

    Background In nursing academia, jealousy and envy are common emotions, engendered by demands for high productivity, intense competition for limited resources, preferences for particular assignments and opportunities for promotions. When these feelings are moderate and part of everyday rivalry, competition and ambition benefit the organisation. However, jealousy and envy can have serious consequences including damaged relationships and communication, and the undermining of colleagues’ performance.

    Discussion Strategies are recommended to provide opportunities for self-reflection and consideration of how the workplace affects nursing academics’ wellbeing and professional performance.

    Conclusion Jealousy and envy can be damaging emotions in the workplace. The embittered, hostile person can undermine and damage relationships, disrupt teams and communication, and undermine organisational performance. Discussing the positive and negative effects of envy and jealousy provides an opportunity for nursing academics to self-reflect and to consider others and their own personal and professional performance.

    Implications for practice Understanding how jealousy and envy impact on the work environment, workplace relationships and individual/team performance is important especially for early career and seasoned nursing academics alike.

UOW Authors


  •   Cleary, Michelle (external author)
  •   Walter, Garry (external author)
  •   Halcomb, Elizabeth
  •   Lopez, Violeta (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Cleary, M., Walter, G., Halcomb, E. & Lopez, V. (2016). An examination of envy and jealousy in nursing academia. Nurse Researcher, 23 (6), 14-19.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84980416270

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4084

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 14

End Page


  • 19

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom