Skip to main content
placeholder image

Recovering knowledge for science education research: Exploring the “Icarus effect” in student work

Journal Article


Download full-text (Open Access)

Abstract


  • Science education research has built a strong body of work on students’ understandings but largely overlooked the nature of science knowledge itself. Legitimation Code Theory (LCT), a rapidly growing approach to education, offers a way of analyzing the organizing principles of knowledge practices and their effects on science education. This article focuses on one specific concept from LCT-semantic gravity-that conceptualizes differences in context dependence. The article uses this concept to qualitatively analyze tertiary student responses to a thermal physics question. One result, that legitimate answers must reside within a specific range of context dependence, illustrates how a focus on the organizing principles of knowledge offers a way forward for science education.

UOW Authors


  •   Georgiou, Helen
  •   Maton, Karl A. (external author)
  •   Sharma, Manjula (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Georgiou, H., Maton, K. & Sharma, M. (2014). Recovering knowledge for science education research: Exploring the “Icarus effect” in student work. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 14 (3), 252-268.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84908685191

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3331&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2330

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 16

Start Page


  • 252

End Page


  • 268

Volume


  • 14

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Science education research has built a strong body of work on students’ understandings but largely overlooked the nature of science knowledge itself. Legitimation Code Theory (LCT), a rapidly growing approach to education, offers a way of analyzing the organizing principles of knowledge practices and their effects on science education. This article focuses on one specific concept from LCT-semantic gravity-that conceptualizes differences in context dependence. The article uses this concept to qualitatively analyze tertiary student responses to a thermal physics question. One result, that legitimate answers must reside within a specific range of context dependence, illustrates how a focus on the organizing principles of knowledge offers a way forward for science education.

UOW Authors


  •   Georgiou, Helen
  •   Maton, Karl A. (external author)
  •   Sharma, Manjula (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Georgiou, H., Maton, K. & Sharma, M. (2014). Recovering knowledge for science education research: Exploring the “Icarus effect” in student work. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 14 (3), 252-268.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84908685191

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3331&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2330

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 16

Start Page


  • 252

End Page


  • 268

Volume


  • 14

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United States