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Thermal and cardiovascular strain imposed by motorcycle protective clothing under Australian summer conditions

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Motorcycle protective clothing can be uncomfortably hot during summer, and this experiment was designed to evaluate the physiological significance of that burden. Twelve males participated in four, 90-min trials (cycling 30 W) across three environments (25, 30, 35 °C [all 40% relative humidity]). Clothing was modified between full and minimal injury protection. Both ensembles were tested at 25 °C, with only the more protective ensemble investigated at 30 and 35 °C. At 35 °C, auditory canal temperature rose at 0.02 °C min(-1) (SD 0.005), deviating from all other trials (p < 0.05). The thresholds for moderate (>38.5 °C) and profound hyperthermia (>40.0 °C) were predicted to occur within 105 min (SD 20.6) and 180 min (SD 33.0), respectively. Profound hyperthermia might eventuate in ~10 h at 30 °C, but should not occur at 25 °C. These outcomes demonstrate a need to enhance the heat dissipation capabilities of motorcycle clothing designed for summer use in hot climates, but without compromising impact protection. Practitioner's Summary: Motorcycle protective clothing can be uncomfortably hot during summer. This experiment was designed to evaluate the physiological significance of this burden across climatic states. In the heat, moderate (>38.5 °C) and profound hyperthermia (>40.0 °C) were predicted to occur within 105 and 180 min, respectively.

Authors


  •   de Rome, Liz (external author)
  •   Taylor, Elizabeth A. (external author)
  •   Croft, Rodney J.
  •   Brown, J (external author)
  •   Fitzharris, Michael P. (external author)
  •   Taylor, Nigel A.S.. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • de Rome, L., Taylor, E. A., Croft, R. J., Brown, J., Fitzharris, M. & Taylor, N. A.S.. Thermal and cardiovascular strain imposed by motorcycle protective clothing under Australian summer conditions. Ergonomics. 2016; 59 (4): 504-513.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84945206594

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4846&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3823

Number Of Pages


  • 9

Start Page


  • 504

End Page


  • 513

Volume


  • 59

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Motorcycle protective clothing can be uncomfortably hot during summer, and this experiment was designed to evaluate the physiological significance of that burden. Twelve males participated in four, 90-min trials (cycling 30 W) across three environments (25, 30, 35 °C [all 40% relative humidity]). Clothing was modified between full and minimal injury protection. Both ensembles were tested at 25 °C, with only the more protective ensemble investigated at 30 and 35 °C. At 35 °C, auditory canal temperature rose at 0.02 °C min(-1) (SD 0.005), deviating from all other trials (p < 0.05). The thresholds for moderate (>38.5 °C) and profound hyperthermia (>40.0 °C) were predicted to occur within 105 min (SD 20.6) and 180 min (SD 33.0), respectively. Profound hyperthermia might eventuate in ~10 h at 30 °C, but should not occur at 25 °C. These outcomes demonstrate a need to enhance the heat dissipation capabilities of motorcycle clothing designed for summer use in hot climates, but without compromising impact protection. Practitioner's Summary: Motorcycle protective clothing can be uncomfortably hot during summer. This experiment was designed to evaluate the physiological significance of this burden across climatic states. In the heat, moderate (>38.5 °C) and profound hyperthermia (>40.0 °C) were predicted to occur within 105 and 180 min, respectively.

Authors


  •   de Rome, Liz (external author)
  •   Taylor, Elizabeth A. (external author)
  •   Croft, Rodney J.
  •   Brown, J (external author)
  •   Fitzharris, Michael P. (external author)
  •   Taylor, Nigel A.S.. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • de Rome, L., Taylor, E. A., Croft, R. J., Brown, J., Fitzharris, M. & Taylor, N. A.S.. Thermal and cardiovascular strain imposed by motorcycle protective clothing under Australian summer conditions. Ergonomics. 2016; 59 (4): 504-513.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84945206594

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4846&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3823

Number Of Pages


  • 9

Start Page


  • 504

End Page


  • 513

Volume


  • 59

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom