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Assembling geographical knowledge of changing worlds

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • This piece is sympathetic to the critical questions and epistemological arguments Larner (2011) presents for the current conjuncture of global transformations. I mobilize Larner’s arguments for process-oriented assemblage thinking and apply them to the particular conjuncture through which one of these transformations – climate change – is being problematized in the Australian empirical context, and its connection to existing and emergent institutional and political formations and knowledge practices. I also point to emergent process-oriented, situated scholarly accounts of climate change in Australia and their potential to expand the contestable spaces whereby alternative politicizations and alternative political and institutional forms might be imagined and enacted. In closing, I reflect on the connection between situated accounts, such as these, and the potential performative effects of situated theorizing.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • McGuirk, P. (2011). Assembling geographical knowledge of changing worlds. Dialogues in Human Geography, 1 (3), 336-341.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84975094243

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3244&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2243

Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 336

End Page


  • 341

Volume


  • 1

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • This piece is sympathetic to the critical questions and epistemological arguments Larner (2011) presents for the current conjuncture of global transformations. I mobilize Larner’s arguments for process-oriented assemblage thinking and apply them to the particular conjuncture through which one of these transformations – climate change – is being problematized in the Australian empirical context, and its connection to existing and emergent institutional and political formations and knowledge practices. I also point to emergent process-oriented, situated scholarly accounts of climate change in Australia and their potential to expand the contestable spaces whereby alternative politicizations and alternative political and institutional forms might be imagined and enacted. In closing, I reflect on the connection between situated accounts, such as these, and the potential performative effects of situated theorizing.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • McGuirk, P. (2011). Assembling geographical knowledge of changing worlds. Dialogues in Human Geography, 1 (3), 336-341.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84975094243

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3244&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2243

Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 336

End Page


  • 341

Volume


  • 1

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom