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Anchoring academic vocabulary with a “hard hitting” haptic pronunciation teaching technique

Chapter


Abstract


  • This chapter describes a simple five-step haptic technique that enhances second language (L2) vocabulary dεvelopment by more actively bringing in the

    pronunciation of the targeted words: the Rhythm Fight Club (RFC; Acton, n.d.). As the name suggests, the RFC involves a boxing-like movement that students

    typically find engaging and fun. The objective of the RFC is to support form-focused

    work on vocabulary and, at the same time, promote intelligible pronunciation. The

    RFC can also be modified and extended to L2 reading instruction in that systematic

    attention to pronunciation can contribute greatly to the encoding and learning process

    (Walter, 2008). In fact, the procedure can be applied in any teaching context,

    helping learners with new vocabulary, assisting with retaining meaning and usage

    as well as pronunciation. Both native- and nonnative-English-speaking instructors

    should find it usefuI and easy to work with.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Burri, M., Baker, A. & Acton, W. (2016). Anchoring academic vocabulary with a “hard hitting” haptic pronunciation teaching technique. In T. Jones (Ed.), Pronunciation in the Classroom: The Overlooked Essential (pp. 17-26). Alexandria, United States: TESOL Press.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2570

Book Title


  • Pronunciation in the Classroom: The Overlooked Essential

Start Page


  • 17

End Page


  • 26

Abstract


  • This chapter describes a simple five-step haptic technique that enhances second language (L2) vocabulary dεvelopment by more actively bringing in the

    pronunciation of the targeted words: the Rhythm Fight Club (RFC; Acton, n.d.). As the name suggests, the RFC involves a boxing-like movement that students

    typically find engaging and fun. The objective of the RFC is to support form-focused

    work on vocabulary and, at the same time, promote intelligible pronunciation. The

    RFC can also be modified and extended to L2 reading instruction in that systematic

    attention to pronunciation can contribute greatly to the encoding and learning process

    (Walter, 2008). In fact, the procedure can be applied in any teaching context,

    helping learners with new vocabulary, assisting with retaining meaning and usage

    as well as pronunciation. Both native- and nonnative-English-speaking instructors

    should find it usefuI and easy to work with.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Burri, M., Baker, A. & Acton, W. (2016). Anchoring academic vocabulary with a “hard hitting” haptic pronunciation teaching technique. In T. Jones (Ed.), Pronunciation in the Classroom: The Overlooked Essential (pp. 17-26). Alexandria, United States: TESOL Press.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/2570

Book Title


  • Pronunciation in the Classroom: The Overlooked Essential

Start Page


  • 17

End Page


  • 26