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Street music and the law: busker perspectives on the impact of local Council rules and regulations

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Street performers have long had an ambiguous relationship with the law. At various times they have been castigated and policed as “beggars in disguise” or treated as an urban nuisance to be tightly controlled and tolerated at best. Recent decades have seen something of an about-face. City governments in many countries are embracing buskers as a cultural and commercial asset and are putting in place legal regimes that aim to simultaneously encourage and control busking. Field work in Australia’s two largest cities—Melbourne and Sydney—can be used to assess whether the rules and conditions that are associated with permit systems are compatible with the goals of most buskers: to make an artistic contribution to the quality of urban life and to make a living. Contrary to the view that state-imposed rules are incompatible with the nature and ethos of busking, contemporary busking laws are widely supported by street musicians and are regarded as facilitative of, rather than a barrier to, busking’s positive contribution to the vitality of the everyday life of the city.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • L. J. McNamara & J. Quilter, 'Street music and the law: busker perspectives on the impact of local Council rules and regulations' (2016) 35 (2) Journal of Musicological Research 113-127.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84974827115

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/2436

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 113

End Page


  • 127

Volume


  • 35

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Street performers have long had an ambiguous relationship with the law. At various times they have been castigated and policed as “beggars in disguise” or treated as an urban nuisance to be tightly controlled and tolerated at best. Recent decades have seen something of an about-face. City governments in many countries are embracing buskers as a cultural and commercial asset and are putting in place legal regimes that aim to simultaneously encourage and control busking. Field work in Australia’s two largest cities—Melbourne and Sydney—can be used to assess whether the rules and conditions that are associated with permit systems are compatible with the goals of most buskers: to make an artistic contribution to the quality of urban life and to make a living. Contrary to the view that state-imposed rules are incompatible with the nature and ethos of busking, contemporary busking laws are widely supported by street musicians and are regarded as facilitative of, rather than a barrier to, busking’s positive contribution to the vitality of the everyday life of the city.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • L. J. McNamara & J. Quilter, 'Street music and the law: busker perspectives on the impact of local Council rules and regulations' (2016) 35 (2) Journal of Musicological Research 113-127.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84974827115

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/2436

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 113

End Page


  • 127

Volume


  • 35

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • United States