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Heterogeneous effects of high school peers on educational outcomes

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • We investigate the relationship between peers’ abilities and educational outcomes at the end

    of high school using data from the rich Longitudinal Study of Young People in England

    (LSYPE) matched to the National Pupil Database of children in state schools in England. In

    particular, we focus on the effect of peers’ abilities, measured through achievements in Key

    Stage 3 (Age 14), on high powered test scores at Ages 16 and 18, and on the probability of

    attending university. Our identification strategy is based on a measure of the peers of peers’

    ability. In particular, for each individual, we look at her high school peers and select their

    primary school peers who do not attend the same high school and who did not attend the

    same primary school as the individual. We then use peers-of-peers ability, measured using

    Age 11 test scores as an instrument for high school average peer ability, measured using

    Age 14 test scores. We also use quantile regression to explore the effect of peers’ ability on

    different parts of the distributions of the outcomes. Our results show that average of peers’

    abilities has a moderate positive effect on test scores at Ages 16 and 18, and that being in a

    school with a large proportion of low-quality peers can have a significantly detrimental effect

    on individual achievements. Furthermore, peers’ ability seems to have a stronger effect on

    students at the bottom of the grade distribution, especially at Age 16.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Mendolia, S., Paloyo, A. R. & Walker, I. (2016). Heterogeneous effects of high school peers on educational outcomes. IZA Discussion Papers, 9795 1-41.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1847&context=buspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/buspapers/843

Number Of Pages


  • 40

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 41

Volume


  • 9795

Abstract


  • We investigate the relationship between peers’ abilities and educational outcomes at the end

    of high school using data from the rich Longitudinal Study of Young People in England

    (LSYPE) matched to the National Pupil Database of children in state schools in England. In

    particular, we focus on the effect of peers’ abilities, measured through achievements in Key

    Stage 3 (Age 14), on high powered test scores at Ages 16 and 18, and on the probability of

    attending university. Our identification strategy is based on a measure of the peers of peers’

    ability. In particular, for each individual, we look at her high school peers and select their

    primary school peers who do not attend the same high school and who did not attend the

    same primary school as the individual. We then use peers-of-peers ability, measured using

    Age 11 test scores as an instrument for high school average peer ability, measured using

    Age 14 test scores. We also use quantile regression to explore the effect of peers’ ability on

    different parts of the distributions of the outcomes. Our results show that average of peers’

    abilities has a moderate positive effect on test scores at Ages 16 and 18, and that being in a

    school with a large proportion of low-quality peers can have a significantly detrimental effect

    on individual achievements. Furthermore, peers’ ability seems to have a stronger effect on

    students at the bottom of the grade distribution, especially at Age 16.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Mendolia, S., Paloyo, A. R. & Walker, I. (2016). Heterogeneous effects of high school peers on educational outcomes. IZA Discussion Papers, 9795 1-41.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1847&context=buspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/buspapers/843

Number Of Pages


  • 40

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 41

Volume


  • 9795