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Manufactured home villages in Australia - a melting pot of chronic disease?

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Manufactured home villages (MHVs) are an increasingly popular housing option for older Australians. This paper reports a cross-sectional survey that sought to describe the health status and health service access of MHV residents. The survey tool comprised demographic and health status items, primary healthcare access perceptions and the World Health Organization Quality of Life tool (WHOQOL-BREF). One-hundred-eighty-six MHV residents from regional NSW completed the survey. Hypertension (54.8%) and arthritis (46.5%) were the most prevalent chronic diseases reported. Overall, respondents expressed a high level of satisfaction with the sense of safety and security (82.8%), neighbours (69.4%) and the overall location of the villages (66.7%). There was good to excellent internal consistency of all four WHOQOL-BREF domain scores, with a comparatively lower sample mean score for the ‘Physical’ and ‘Psychological’ domains. MHV residents are a significant cohort of older people with high rates of chronic disease and reasonably poor access to transport services, which affects their capacity to access health services. They also have comparatively low levels of quality of physical and psychological life along with low levels of satisfaction with their health.

UOW Authors


  •   Robinson, Karin (external author)
  •   Ghosh, Abhijeet (external author)
  •   Halcomb, Elizabeth

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Robinson, K., Ghosh, A. & Halcomb, E. (2017). Manufactured home villages in Australia - a melting pot of chronic disease?. Australian Journal of Primary Health, 23 (1), 97-103.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85013478404

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5312&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4288

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 97

End Page


  • 103

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Manufactured home villages (MHVs) are an increasingly popular housing option for older Australians. This paper reports a cross-sectional survey that sought to describe the health status and health service access of MHV residents. The survey tool comprised demographic and health status items, primary healthcare access perceptions and the World Health Organization Quality of Life tool (WHOQOL-BREF). One-hundred-eighty-six MHV residents from regional NSW completed the survey. Hypertension (54.8%) and arthritis (46.5%) were the most prevalent chronic diseases reported. Overall, respondents expressed a high level of satisfaction with the sense of safety and security (82.8%), neighbours (69.4%) and the overall location of the villages (66.7%). There was good to excellent internal consistency of all four WHOQOL-BREF domain scores, with a comparatively lower sample mean score for the ‘Physical’ and ‘Psychological’ domains. MHV residents are a significant cohort of older people with high rates of chronic disease and reasonably poor access to transport services, which affects their capacity to access health services. They also have comparatively low levels of quality of physical and psychological life along with low levels of satisfaction with their health.

UOW Authors


  •   Robinson, Karin (external author)
  •   Ghosh, Abhijeet (external author)
  •   Halcomb, Elizabeth

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Robinson, K., Ghosh, A. & Halcomb, E. (2017). Manufactured home villages in Australia - a melting pot of chronic disease?. Australian Journal of Primary Health, 23 (1), 97-103.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85013478404

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5312&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4288

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 97

End Page


  • 103

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • Australia