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Australians are not meeting the recommended intakes for Omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: results of an analysis from the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Health benefits have been attributed to omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA). Therefore it is important to know if Australians are currently meeting the recommended intake for n-3 LCPUFA and if they have increased since the last National Nutrition Survey in 1995 (NNS 1995). Dietary intake data was obtained from the recent 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2011–2012 NNPAS). Linoleic acid (LA) intakes have decreased whilst alpha-linolenic acid (LNA) and n-3 LCPUFA intakes have increased primarily due to n-3 LCPUFA supplements. The median n-3 LCPUFA intakes are less than 50% of the mean n-3 LCPUFA intakes which highlights the highly-skewed n-3 LCPUFA intakes, which shows that there are some people consuming high amounts of n-3 LCPUFA, but the vast majority of the population are consuming much lower amounts. Only 20% of the population meets the recommended n-3 LCPUFA intakes and only 10% of women of childbearing age meet the recommended docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake. Fish and seafood is by far the richest source of n-3 LCPUFA including DHA.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Meyer, B. J. (2016). Australians are not meeting the recommended intakes for Omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: results of an analysis from the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Nutrients, 8 (3), 111-1-111-12.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84959250759

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4510&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3487

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • 111-1

End Page


  • 111-12

Volume


  • 8

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • Switzerland

Abstract


  • Health benefits have been attributed to omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA). Therefore it is important to know if Australians are currently meeting the recommended intake for n-3 LCPUFA and if they have increased since the last National Nutrition Survey in 1995 (NNS 1995). Dietary intake data was obtained from the recent 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2011–2012 NNPAS). Linoleic acid (LA) intakes have decreased whilst alpha-linolenic acid (LNA) and n-3 LCPUFA intakes have increased primarily due to n-3 LCPUFA supplements. The median n-3 LCPUFA intakes are less than 50% of the mean n-3 LCPUFA intakes which highlights the highly-skewed n-3 LCPUFA intakes, which shows that there are some people consuming high amounts of n-3 LCPUFA, but the vast majority of the population are consuming much lower amounts. Only 20% of the population meets the recommended n-3 LCPUFA intakes and only 10% of women of childbearing age meet the recommended docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake. Fish and seafood is by far the richest source of n-3 LCPUFA including DHA.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Meyer, B. J. (2016). Australians are not meeting the recommended intakes for Omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: results of an analysis from the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey. Nutrients, 8 (3), 111-1-111-12.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84959250759

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4510&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3487

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • 111-1

End Page


  • 111-12

Volume


  • 8

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • Switzerland