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Positive trends in Southern Hemisphere carbonyl sulfide

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Transport of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) from the troposphere to the stratosphere contributes sulfur to the stratospheric aerosol layer, which reflects incoming short-wave solar radiation, cooling the climate system. Previous analyses of OCS observations have shown no significant trend, suggesting that OCS is unlikely to be a major contributor to the reported increases in stratospheric aerosol loading and indicating a balanced OCS budget. Here we present analyses of ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer measurements of OCS at three Southern Hemisphere sites spanning 34.45°S to 77.80°S. At all three sites statistically significant positive trends are seen from 2001 to 2014 with an observed overall trend in total column OCS at Wollongong of 0.73 ± 0.03%/yr, at Lauder of 0.43 ± 0.02%/yr, and at Arrival Heights of 0.45 ± 0.05%/yr. These observed trends in OCS imply that the OCS budget is not balanced and could contribute to constraints on current estimates of sources and sinks.

Authors


  •   Kremser, Stefanie (external author)
  •   Jones, Nicholas B.
  •   Palm, Mathias (external author)
  •   Lejeune, Bernard (external author)
  •   Wang, Yuting (external author)
  •   Smale, D (external author)
  •   Deutscher, Nicholas M.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Kremser, S., Jones, N. B., Palm, M., Lejeune, B., Wang, Y., Smale, D. & Deutscher, N. M. (2015). Positive trends in Southern Hemisphere carbonyl sulfide. Geophysical Research Letters, 42 (21), 9473-9480.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84954558994

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4492&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3469

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 9473

End Page


  • 9480

Volume


  • 42

Issue


  • 21

Abstract


  • Transport of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) from the troposphere to the stratosphere contributes sulfur to the stratospheric aerosol layer, which reflects incoming short-wave solar radiation, cooling the climate system. Previous analyses of OCS observations have shown no significant trend, suggesting that OCS is unlikely to be a major contributor to the reported increases in stratospheric aerosol loading and indicating a balanced OCS budget. Here we present analyses of ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer measurements of OCS at three Southern Hemisphere sites spanning 34.45°S to 77.80°S. At all three sites statistically significant positive trends are seen from 2001 to 2014 with an observed overall trend in total column OCS at Wollongong of 0.73 ± 0.03%/yr, at Lauder of 0.43 ± 0.02%/yr, and at Arrival Heights of 0.45 ± 0.05%/yr. These observed trends in OCS imply that the OCS budget is not balanced and could contribute to constraints on current estimates of sources and sinks.

Authors


  •   Kremser, Stefanie (external author)
  •   Jones, Nicholas B.
  •   Palm, Mathias (external author)
  •   Lejeune, Bernard (external author)
  •   Wang, Yuting (external author)
  •   Smale, D (external author)
  •   Deutscher, Nicholas M.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Kremser, S., Jones, N. B., Palm, M., Lejeune, B., Wang, Y., Smale, D. & Deutscher, N. M. (2015). Positive trends in Southern Hemisphere carbonyl sulfide. Geophysical Research Letters, 42 (21), 9473-9480.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84954558994

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4492&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3469

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 9473

End Page


  • 9480

Volume


  • 42

Issue


  • 21