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Nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza vaccination: an integrative review

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Aims and objectives

    To critically analyse the literature describing nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza vaccination.

    Background

    Influenza is a serious illness that has significant impacts on productivity, health outcomes and healthcare costs. Despite the recommendations for nurses to be vaccinated annually against influenza, the vaccination rates remain suboptimal.

    Design

    Integrative literature review.

    Methods

    An integrative review was conducted as described by Whittemore and Knafl (2005). A search of CINAHL, Cochrane Library, ProQuest Central, ClinicalKey, ScienceDirect, Wiley Online Library, and Informit was undertaken to identify relevant papers. Given the heterogeneity of included studies, a narrative approach was used to analyse the data.

    Results

    There was limited research available on this topic area, with only 10 papers identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Five themes were identified: the relationship between knowledge and influenza vaccination, perception of risk, motivators for influenza vaccination, barriers to influenza vaccination and impact of demographics on vaccination.

    Conclusions

    Despite the evidence for the protective effects of influenza vaccination, rates of vaccination among nurses remain sub-optimal. Nurses' influenza vaccination practices likely relate to their level of knowledge and perception of risk; the greater nurses' knowledge regarding influenza and influenza vaccination the higher their perception of risk and the more likely they are to be vaccinated. This also translates to the advice that they give patients with vaccinated nurses more inclined to recommend vaccination than those unvaccinated.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    The practices of nurses related to influenza vaccination may translate to the advice that they give their patients. Understanding the knowledge levels, practices and attitudes of nurses can assist in developing strategies to enhance education of nurses.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Smith, S., Sim, J. & Halcomb, E. (2016). Nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza vaccination: an integrative review. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25 (19-20), 2730-2744.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84971402191

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5141&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4117

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 2730

End Page


  • 2744

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 19-20

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Aims and objectives

    To critically analyse the literature describing nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza vaccination.

    Background

    Influenza is a serious illness that has significant impacts on productivity, health outcomes and healthcare costs. Despite the recommendations for nurses to be vaccinated annually against influenza, the vaccination rates remain suboptimal.

    Design

    Integrative literature review.

    Methods

    An integrative review was conducted as described by Whittemore and Knafl (2005). A search of CINAHL, Cochrane Library, ProQuest Central, ClinicalKey, ScienceDirect, Wiley Online Library, and Informit was undertaken to identify relevant papers. Given the heterogeneity of included studies, a narrative approach was used to analyse the data.

    Results

    There was limited research available on this topic area, with only 10 papers identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Five themes were identified: the relationship between knowledge and influenza vaccination, perception of risk, motivators for influenza vaccination, barriers to influenza vaccination and impact of demographics on vaccination.

    Conclusions

    Despite the evidence for the protective effects of influenza vaccination, rates of vaccination among nurses remain sub-optimal. Nurses' influenza vaccination practices likely relate to their level of knowledge and perception of risk; the greater nurses' knowledge regarding influenza and influenza vaccination the higher their perception of risk and the more likely they are to be vaccinated. This also translates to the advice that they give patients with vaccinated nurses more inclined to recommend vaccination than those unvaccinated.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    The practices of nurses related to influenza vaccination may translate to the advice that they give their patients. Understanding the knowledge levels, practices and attitudes of nurses can assist in developing strategies to enhance education of nurses.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Smith, S., Sim, J. & Halcomb, E. (2016). Nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza vaccination: an integrative review. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25 (19-20), 2730-2744.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84971402191

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5141&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/4117

Number Of Pages


  • 14

Start Page


  • 2730

End Page


  • 2744

Volume


  • 25

Issue


  • 19-20

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom