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The utility of heart rate and minute ventilation as predictors of whole-body metabolic rate during occupational simulations involving load carriage

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The utility of cardiac and ventilatory predictors of metabolic rate derived under temperate and heated laboratory conditions was evaluated during three fire-fighting simulations (70-mm hose drag, Hazmat recovery, bushfire hose drag; N = 16 per simulation). The limits of agreement for cardiac (temperate: − 0.54 to 1.77; heated: − 1.39 to 0.80 l min− 1) and ventilatory surrogates (temperate: − 0.19 to 1.27; heated: − 0.26 to 1.16 l min− 1) revealed an over-estimation of oxygen consumption that exceeded the acceptable limits required by occupational physiologists (N = 25; ± 0.24 l min− 1). Although ventilatory predictions offered superior precision during low-intensity work (P < 0.05), a cardiac prediction was superior during more demanding work (P < 0.05). Deriving those equations under heated conditions failed to improve precision, with the exception of the cardiac surrogate during low-intensity work (P < 0.05). These observations imply that individualised prediction curves are necessary for valid estimations of metabolic demand in the field.

Authors


  •   Notley, Sean (external author)
  •   Peoples, Gregory E.
  •   Taylor, Nigel A.S.. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Notley, S. R., Peoples, G. E. & Taylor, N. A.S. The utility of heart rate and minute ventilation as predictors of whole-body metabolic rate during occupational simulations involving load carriage. Ergonomics: an international journal of research and practice in human factors and ergonomics. 2015; 58 (10): 1671-1681.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84927748586

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3460

Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 1671

End Page


  • 1681

Volume


  • 58

Issue


  • 10

Abstract


  • The utility of cardiac and ventilatory predictors of metabolic rate derived under temperate and heated laboratory conditions was evaluated during three fire-fighting simulations (70-mm hose drag, Hazmat recovery, bushfire hose drag; N = 16 per simulation). The limits of agreement for cardiac (temperate: − 0.54 to 1.77; heated: − 1.39 to 0.80 l min− 1) and ventilatory surrogates (temperate: − 0.19 to 1.27; heated: − 0.26 to 1.16 l min− 1) revealed an over-estimation of oxygen consumption that exceeded the acceptable limits required by occupational physiologists (N = 25; ± 0.24 l min− 1). Although ventilatory predictions offered superior precision during low-intensity work (P < 0.05), a cardiac prediction was superior during more demanding work (P < 0.05). Deriving those equations under heated conditions failed to improve precision, with the exception of the cardiac surrogate during low-intensity work (P < 0.05). These observations imply that individualised prediction curves are necessary for valid estimations of metabolic demand in the field.

Authors


  •   Notley, Sean (external author)
  •   Peoples, Gregory E.
  •   Taylor, Nigel A.S.. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Notley, S. R., Peoples, G. E. & Taylor, N. A.S. The utility of heart rate and minute ventilation as predictors of whole-body metabolic rate during occupational simulations involving load carriage. Ergonomics: an international journal of research and practice in human factors and ergonomics. 2015; 58 (10): 1671-1681.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84927748586

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3460

Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 1671

End Page


  • 1681

Volume


  • 58

Issue


  • 10