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Conserving marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction: co-evolution and interaction with the law of the sea

Chapter


Abstract


  • As global shipping intensifies and technological advances provide more opportun.

    ltles to access the resources of the high seas and the deep seabed beyond

    natwnal jurisdiction (ABNJ), the catalogue of threats to the marine environment

    and its biodiversity increase commensurately.' Seaborne trade and passenger traffic are rapidly expanding and are expected to double over the next

    two decades. The risks to the marine environment and its biodiversity from

    intentional and accidental vessel-source discharges including oil and other hazardous

    substances, noise, and ship strikes on marine mammals, are likely to

    be compounded with more prevalent high-seas traffic. The deep sea fishing

    industry is now supported by a battery of technological innovations including

    global positioning systems, multi-beam sonar, and stronger and more powerful

    cables and winches. Fishing nets and lines are composed of virtually indestructible

    synthetic material and may be laid over vast areas of ocean. Heavy bottom

    trawling gear has already caused substantial damage to vulnerable marine ecosystems.

    Beyond these threats, new and emerging uses of ABNJ such as more

    intrusive marine scientific research, bioprospecting, deep seabed mining, and

    environmental modification activities to mitigate the effects of climate change

    have the potential to harm the highly interconnected and sensitive ecosystems

    of the open ocean and the deep seabed, if not sustainably managed now and into

    the future.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Warner, R. M. (2015). Conserving marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction: co-evolution and interaction with the law of the sea. In D. R.. Rothwell, A. G.O.. Elferink, K. N. Scott & T. Stephens (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Law of the Sea (pp. 752-776). United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780198715481

Book Title


  • The Oxford Handbook of the Law of the Sea

Start Page


  • 752

End Page


  • 776

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • As global shipping intensifies and technological advances provide more opportun.

    ltles to access the resources of the high seas and the deep seabed beyond

    natwnal jurisdiction (ABNJ), the catalogue of threats to the marine environment

    and its biodiversity increase commensurately.' Seaborne trade and passenger traffic are rapidly expanding and are expected to double over the next

    two decades. The risks to the marine environment and its biodiversity from

    intentional and accidental vessel-source discharges including oil and other hazardous

    substances, noise, and ship strikes on marine mammals, are likely to

    be compounded with more prevalent high-seas traffic. The deep sea fishing

    industry is now supported by a battery of technological innovations including

    global positioning systems, multi-beam sonar, and stronger and more powerful

    cables and winches. Fishing nets and lines are composed of virtually indestructible

    synthetic material and may be laid over vast areas of ocean. Heavy bottom

    trawling gear has already caused substantial damage to vulnerable marine ecosystems.

    Beyond these threats, new and emerging uses of ABNJ such as more

    intrusive marine scientific research, bioprospecting, deep seabed mining, and

    environmental modification activities to mitigate the effects of climate change

    have the potential to harm the highly interconnected and sensitive ecosystems

    of the open ocean and the deep seabed, if not sustainably managed now and into

    the future.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Warner, R. M. (2015). Conserving marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction: co-evolution and interaction with the law of the sea. In D. R.. Rothwell, A. G.O.. Elferink, K. N. Scott & T. Stephens (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Law of the Sea (pp. 752-776). United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780198715481

Book Title


  • The Oxford Handbook of the Law of the Sea

Start Page


  • 752

End Page


  • 776

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom