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A qualitative analysis of young drivers’ perceptions of driver distraction social marketing interventions

Conference Paper


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Abstract


  • This study gives insight into why current driver distraction social marketing interventions are not motivating the high-risk target audience of young drivers to cease using their mobile phones when driving. Three focus groups (n=30) were conducted with drivers aged 18-25 years old to explore current attitudes and behaviours in regard to mobile phone use when driving. Additionally four emergent themes were identified from the target audience’s reactions to six social marketing interventions specifically targeting mobile phone cessation. These themes are analysed through the lens of the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) comprising perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, response efficacy and self-efficacy.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Turnbull, N. & Algie, J. (2015). A qualitative analysis of young drivers’ perceptions of driver distraction social marketing interventions. World Social Marketing Conference (pp. 1-7). Fuse Events.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/context/buspapers/article/1817/type/native/viewcontent

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/buspapers/813

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 7

Abstract


  • This study gives insight into why current driver distraction social marketing interventions are not motivating the high-risk target audience of young drivers to cease using their mobile phones when driving. Three focus groups (n=30) were conducted with drivers aged 18-25 years old to explore current attitudes and behaviours in regard to mobile phone use when driving. Additionally four emergent themes were identified from the target audience’s reactions to six social marketing interventions specifically targeting mobile phone cessation. These themes are analysed through the lens of the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) comprising perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, response efficacy and self-efficacy.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Turnbull, N. & Algie, J. (2015). A qualitative analysis of young drivers’ perceptions of driver distraction social marketing interventions. World Social Marketing Conference (pp. 1-7). Fuse Events.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/context/buspapers/article/1817/type/native/viewcontent

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/buspapers/813

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 7