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The hybrid origin of “modern” humans

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Recent genomic research has shown that hybridization between substantially diverged lineages is the rule, not the exception, in human evolution. However, the importance of hybridization in shaping the genotype and phenotype of Homo sapiens remains debated. Here we argue that current evidence for hybridization in human evolution suggests not only that it was important, but that it was an essential creative force in the emergence of our variable, adaptable species. We then extend this argument to a reappraisal of the archaeological record, proposing that the exchange of cultural information between divergent groups may have facilitated the emergence of cultural innovation. We discuss the implications of this Divergence and Hybridization Model for considering the taxonomy of our lineage.

UOW Authors


  •   Ackermann, Rebecca R. (external author)
  •   Mackay, Alex C.
  •   Arnold, Michael L. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Ackermann, R. Rogers., Mackay, A. & Arnold, M. L. (2016). The hybrid origin of “modern” humans. Evolutionary Biology, 43 (1), 1-11.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84958755370

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3538

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 11

Volume


  • 43

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Recent genomic research has shown that hybridization between substantially diverged lineages is the rule, not the exception, in human evolution. However, the importance of hybridization in shaping the genotype and phenotype of Homo sapiens remains debated. Here we argue that current evidence for hybridization in human evolution suggests not only that it was important, but that it was an essential creative force in the emergence of our variable, adaptable species. We then extend this argument to a reappraisal of the archaeological record, proposing that the exchange of cultural information between divergent groups may have facilitated the emergence of cultural innovation. We discuss the implications of this Divergence and Hybridization Model for considering the taxonomy of our lineage.

UOW Authors


  •   Ackermann, Rebecca R. (external author)
  •   Mackay, Alex C.
  •   Arnold, Michael L. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • Ackermann, R. Rogers., Mackay, A. & Arnold, M. L. (2016). The hybrid origin of “modern” humans. Evolutionary Biology, 43 (1), 1-11.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84958755370

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3538

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 11

Volume


  • 43

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United States