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Experimental and numerical assessment of shear surface damage using 3D point clouds

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • This paper describes modelling of shearing of rock joint surfaces using 30 point clouds generated using

    photogrammetry. High resolution 30 images of discontinuity surfaces were created before and after

    shearing. The surface damage due to shearing of joint surfaces was assessed using image processing by

    comparing the 30 images of undamaged surfaces with those of damaged surfaces. The shear surfaces were

    concrete replicas of natural surfaces. The damage due to shearing was estimated using numerical modelling

    in which comparison was made between the concrete surfaces before and after the shear test. It was found

    that the modelling results were fairly well correlated with the observed surface damage, thus validating the

    numerical models. The digitised surfaces could also be used to predict anisotropic shear strength and

    damage of the asperities by numerically shearing the joint surfaces at various directions.

UOW Authors


Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Karekal, S., Poropat, G. V. & Guo, H. (2013). Experimental and numerical assessment of shear surface damage using 3D point clouds. In P. Dight (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Symposium on Slope Stability in Open Pit Mining and Civil Engineering (pp. 273-280). University of Western Australia.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/4592

Start Page


  • 273

End Page


  • 280

Abstract


  • This paper describes modelling of shearing of rock joint surfaces using 30 point clouds generated using

    photogrammetry. High resolution 30 images of discontinuity surfaces were created before and after

    shearing. The surface damage due to shearing of joint surfaces was assessed using image processing by

    comparing the 30 images of undamaged surfaces with those of damaged surfaces. The shear surfaces were

    concrete replicas of natural surfaces. The damage due to shearing was estimated using numerical modelling

    in which comparison was made between the concrete surfaces before and after the shear test. It was found

    that the modelling results were fairly well correlated with the observed surface damage, thus validating the

    numerical models. The digitised surfaces could also be used to predict anisotropic shear strength and

    damage of the asperities by numerically shearing the joint surfaces at various directions.

UOW Authors


Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Karekal, S., Poropat, G. V. & Guo, H. (2013). Experimental and numerical assessment of shear surface damage using 3D point clouds. In P. Dight (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Symposium on Slope Stability in Open Pit Mining and Civil Engineering (pp. 273-280). University of Western Australia.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/4592

Start Page


  • 273

End Page


  • 280