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Lean body mass associated with upper body strength in healthy older adults while higher body fat limits lower extremity performance and endurance

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Impaired strength adversely influences an older person’s ability to perform

    activities of daily living. A cross-sectional study of 117 independently living men and

    women (age = 73.4 9.4 year; body mass index (BMI) = 27.6 4.8 kg/m2) aimed to

    assess the association between body composition and: (1) upper body strength (handgrip

    strength, HGS); (2) lower extremity performance (timed up and go (TUG) and sit to stand

    test (STS)); and (3) endurance (6-minute walk (SMWT). Body composition (% fat; lean body

    mass (LBM)) was assessed using bioelectrical impedance. Habitual physical activity was

    measured using the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire (MLTPA) and

    dietary macronutrient intake, assessed using 24 h recalls and 3-day food records. Regression

    analyses included the covariates, protein intake (g/kg), MLTPA, age and sex. For natural

    logarithm (Ln) of right HGS, LBM (p < 0.001) and % body fat (p < 0.005) were significant

    (r2 = 46.5%; p < 0.000). For left LnHGS, LBM (p < 0.000), age (p = 0.036), protein intake

    (p = 0.015) and LnMLTPA (p = 0.015) were significant (r2 = 0.535; p < 0.000). For SMW,

    % body fat, age and LnMLTPA were significant (r2 = 0.346; p < 0.000). For STS, % body

    fat and age were significant (r2 = 0.251; p < 0.000). LBM is a strong predictor of upper

    body strength while higher % body fat and lower physical activity are associated with poorer

    outcomes on tests of lower extremity performance.

Authors


  •   Charlton, Karen E.
  •   Batterham, Marijka
  •   Langford, Kelly (external author)
  •   Lateo, Jenna (external author)
  •   Brock, Erin (external author)
  •   Walton, Karen L.
  •   Lyons-Wall, Philippa M. (external author)
  •   Eisenhauer, Katie (external author)
  •   Green, Nick (external author)
  •   Mclean, Cameron (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Charlton, K., Batterham, M., Langford, K., Lateo, J., Brock, E., Walton, K., Lyons-Wall, P., Eisenhauer, K., Green, N. & Mclean, C. (2015). Lean body mass associated with upper body strength in healthy older adults while higher body fat limits lower extremity performance and endurance. nutrients, 7 (9), 7126-7142.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84940846648

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4139&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3116

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 16

Start Page


  • 7126

End Page


  • 7142

Volume


  • 7

Issue


  • 9

Place Of Publication


  • Switzerland

Abstract


  • Impaired strength adversely influences an older person’s ability to perform

    activities of daily living. A cross-sectional study of 117 independently living men and

    women (age = 73.4 9.4 year; body mass index (BMI) = 27.6 4.8 kg/m2) aimed to

    assess the association between body composition and: (1) upper body strength (handgrip

    strength, HGS); (2) lower extremity performance (timed up and go (TUG) and sit to stand

    test (STS)); and (3) endurance (6-minute walk (SMWT). Body composition (% fat; lean body

    mass (LBM)) was assessed using bioelectrical impedance. Habitual physical activity was

    measured using the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire (MLTPA) and

    dietary macronutrient intake, assessed using 24 h recalls and 3-day food records. Regression

    analyses included the covariates, protein intake (g/kg), MLTPA, age and sex. For natural

    logarithm (Ln) of right HGS, LBM (p < 0.001) and % body fat (p < 0.005) were significant

    (r2 = 46.5%; p < 0.000). For left LnHGS, LBM (p < 0.000), age (p = 0.036), protein intake

    (p = 0.015) and LnMLTPA (p = 0.015) were significant (r2 = 0.535; p < 0.000). For SMW,

    % body fat, age and LnMLTPA were significant (r2 = 0.346; p < 0.000). For STS, % body

    fat and age were significant (r2 = 0.251; p < 0.000). LBM is a strong predictor of upper

    body strength while higher % body fat and lower physical activity are associated with poorer

    outcomes on tests of lower extremity performance.

Authors


  •   Charlton, Karen E.
  •   Batterham, Marijka
  •   Langford, Kelly (external author)
  •   Lateo, Jenna (external author)
  •   Brock, Erin (external author)
  •   Walton, Karen L.
  •   Lyons-Wall, Philippa M. (external author)
  •   Eisenhauer, Katie (external author)
  •   Green, Nick (external author)
  •   Mclean, Cameron (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Charlton, K., Batterham, M., Langford, K., Lateo, J., Brock, E., Walton, K., Lyons-Wall, P., Eisenhauer, K., Green, N. & Mclean, C. (2015). Lean body mass associated with upper body strength in healthy older adults while higher body fat limits lower extremity performance and endurance. nutrients, 7 (9), 7126-7142.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84940846648

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4139&context=smhpapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/3116

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 16

Start Page


  • 7126

End Page


  • 7142

Volume


  • 7

Issue


  • 9

Place Of Publication


  • Switzerland